Here’s How to Lower Some of the Costs of Raising School-Aged Kids

click photo for more information
Here’s How to Lower Some of the Costs of Raising School-Aged Kids
The first few years of parenthood can be a sleep-deprived, money-sucking blur. You’re constantly counting down to the next stage of child-rearing when you anticipate expenses to ease up. Like when you’re done with formula and diapers, and you don’t have to buy a new set of clothes every three months. Or when your kid’s in school and you can finally stop paying for full-time child care. But as you reach what you think is the light at the end of the tunnel, you come to realize that raising a school-aged kid doesn’t exactly come cheap either. These 13 money-saving strategies can provide some financial relief when it comes to your children’s expenses. 1. Don’t Overspend During Back-to-School Season According to the National Retail Federation, shopping for school expenses is the second-highest annual consumer event (only falling behind winter holiday spending). Save money by comparing prices, shopping at discount stores, buying in bulk and taking advantage of back-to-school sales tax holidays.  It’s also imperative to budget for back-to-school expenses ahead of time. Take inventory of what you have, make a list of the essentials and price items to establish a spending limit.  Pro Tip Set up a sinking fund to save money over several months. Temporary side gigs, picking up extra shifts or participating in a no-spend challenge can help you pad your savings. 2. Buy Zero-Waste Alternatives for Disposable Goods You Frequently Purchase If you’re buying hundreds of plastic sandwich bags and juice boxes that your kids just throw away at the end of lunch, try going zero-waste. You’ll save money in the long run purchasing reusable products — like a couple of washable containers and a Thermos — once and using them all year. 3. Throw Affordable Birthday Parties Celebrate your child’s birthday on a budget by sending out free electronic invites, choosing a cheap venue like a park and making your own cake and goodies. Streamlining your guest list will also help reduce costs. 4. Save Money on Extracurricular Activities Your kid might want to sign up for piano lessons, gymnastics and basketball, but the cost of after-school activities can take a chunk out of a parent’s budget.  Nail down your child’s interests to one or two activities and see if any local government or nonprofit agencies — like your school system or the Police Athletic League — offer programs at a lower rate than private organizations. See if you can get discounts for enrolling more than one child or referring your neighbors to enroll their kids. Cut travel costs by carpooling and equipment expenses by buying secondhand.  FROM THE SAVE MONEY FORUM Traveling All 50 States On a Budget 10/9/19 @ 8:40 PM Teaching Your Kids to Save: I am a Bit Confused (HELP) 10/10/19 @ 12:24 PM Acorns 8/14/19 @ 6:00 PM See more in Save Money or ask a money question 5. Get Swim Lessons for Less Over 1,000 YMCA locations across the nation offer a program called Safety Around Water, which teaches kids about water safety and basic swimming instruction. Many branches have been able to offer these YMCA swim lessons program for free or reduced cost due to funding from the national organization or community fundraising efforts. Contact your local YMCA branch for more information. 6. DIY Your Kid’s Summer Camp Experience Paying weekly summer camp costs can be brutal. An alternate option? Form your own summer camp co-op.  Gather a bunch of parents together who can take turns playing camp counselor and watching the kids each week. Brainstorm low-cost activities to fill up the day, and collectively chip in for snacks and lunches. 7. Save Money on Your Next Trip to Disney For many parents, Disney is the big vacation mecca, but visiting Mickey and Minnie isn’t cheap. To save money at Disney World or visit Disneyland on a budget, find accommodations not associated with the park, make your own food and arrive at the park at least 30 minutes before gates open to avoid long lines and make the most of your day. Pro Tip Want to score a cheap Disney souvenir? Look for pressed penny machines, which turn your coins into theme-park memorabilia — usually for less than a dollar. 8. Don’t Blow Through Cash Entertaining the Kids The refrain of “I’m bored” grows old fast. This list of 100 free things to do — most of which are family friendly — is clutch when you need to fill time with something fun but don’t want to spend a bunch of money.  Host a game night or put on a talent show. Attend a local festival or pitch a tent at a free campsite. 9. Find Inexpensive Tutoring No one wants their child struggling in school, but tutors that charge upwards of $80 an hour can be tough for families to shoulder financially. Get low-cost or free tutoring online through sites like Khan Academy or by watching educational YouTube channels. Other ways to cut costs are asking your child’s teacher for help, seeing if there’s a peer tutoring program at school, checking for tutoring programs at your library or tapping into your social network for subject matter experts. 10. Eliminate Post-Holiday Gift-Giving Remorse Heed the four-gift rule. It conveniently rhymes so you’ll remember: Get one thing they want, one thing they need, one thing they’ll wear and something to read. Other tips to save money on Christmas shopping are shopping online, using money-saving apps like Stash or Acorns and snagging deals year round. Pro Tip Set up a Christmas savings plan months before Dec. 25. Figure out how much you plan to spend and divide that amount by how many weeks you have left to shop to come up with your weekly savings goal. 11. Learn How to Take Professional-Quality Photos Go the DIY approach to avoid paying for pricy photo packages. Some professional photo tips one photographer (and mom of two) shared with us are to take advantage of the best natural light, find a good outdoor location and get multiple shots.  12. Be Frugal About Buying Clothes Host clothing swaps with other families in your neighborhood, repurpose old clothes as pajamas, shop at consignment stores and borrow one-time-use outfits. You can also ask family and friends to give clothes rather than toys as birthday gifts to save money on kids’ clothing. 13. Just Say No to Your Kids Sometimes you’ve got to lay down the hammer. Maybe after denying their requests a couple dozen times, they’ll stop bugging you to buy candy and toys at the register. According to psychologists, saying no to your kids can actually benefit your children by helping them grow to be better money managers. Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
1
35

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Stay-at-Home Parents: Here are 10 Side Gigs You Can Do With Kids in Tow

click photo for more information
Stay-at-Home Parents: Here are 10 Side Gigs You Can Do With Kids in Tow
Stay-at-home parents have ALL the free time… …Said no one who ever actually stayed at home with their kids. Commanding the homefront is a job with a capital J. And yet, during those hours at home while the kids are playing in the sprinkler, watching cartoons or — heaven bless them — napping, parents often feel like they could be doing something productive. Lucrative even. We hear you, frazzled moms and dads. Here are 10 ways to make money as a stay-at-home parent that you can squeeze in between trips to the playground and running laundry.  Your time is worth a lot, but toddlers don’t pay. These gigs do. 10 Ways to Make Money as a Stay-at-Home Parent 1. Make and sell stuff online Let’s get one thing out of the way: Etsy is not a set-it-and-forget-it type of website. Compared to other online marketplaces, Etsy takes some work. But that hard work can pay off as a profitable side business. And if you’re already inclined toward making crafts or spotting cool vintage finds, Etsy is the ideal marketplace for those one-of-a-kinds. Read our complete guide to selling on Etsy to help you get started. Not the crafty type? You can still make a handsome sum selling through Fulfillment by Amazon. A lot of Amazon sellers are private-label businesses that buy generic products from abroad, brand and pack them, then send them off to Amazon, which does the rest for you. 2. Work on Mechanical Turk Speaking of Amazon, the online retail giant’s Mechanical Turk platform lets you complete small tasks online for a price. According to Michael Naab, who wrote our guide (and a book) on making money with Mechanical Turk, you can expect to earn around $6 to $12 an hour doing Human Intelligence Tasks (HITs) on the platform. HITs range anywhere from completing surveys to Excel spreadsheet tasks to audio transcription. 3. Be an online tutor Tutoring has become a prime opportunity for anyone who wants to work from home. Online tutoring companies abound, and there’s often a lot of flexibility around when and how many hours you want to devote. Consider signing on with one of these nine companies and earn money tutoring during the kids’ swim lessons or playgroup. 4. Teach English Online Interested in more teaching opportunities? To fill the demand for English around the world, many companies hire native English speakers to run classes online. In most cases, online teachers can set their own schedules and earn up to $25 an hour. To meet baseline qualifications, all you need is English fluency, a high school diploma and a computer with a high-speed internet connection. Ready to get started? Here are seven legit sites that will pay you to teach English online. 5. Write for a parenting blog You’re already a subject-matter expert in the care and feeding of small humans. Get paid for hard-earned that knowledge by writing for a parenting blog or magazine. 6. Babysit other people’s babies You’re already watching your own kids. You’ve got your house stocked with crafts and snacks and all the outlets are child-proofed. It’s not a new idea for stay-at-home parents to take in other charges, but now there are plenty of sites to connect you to potential clients. For starters, check out Care.com and Sittercity to create a free membership. 7. Babysit fur babies A cardinal rule of staying at home with kids: Get out of the house. While you’re running errands and hitting the library, build in some paying work as a pet sitter or dog-walker. As you might have guessed, there’s an app (or six) for that. FROM THE MAKE MONEY FORUM FlexJobs 9/27/19 @ 5:43 PM s work at home 4/3/19 @ 9:26 PM Shortage in Budget 9/26/19 @ 1:16 PM SSDI Isn't Enough To Make Ends Meet 9/25/19 @ 10:38 AM See more in Make Money or ask a money question 8. Sell home-baked goods Even if you’re not a bona fide pastry chef, there’s money to be made whipping up specialty goodies the rest of the world doesn’t have the motivation to create. We talked to two people with home-baking side businesses about how they found a sweet spot. 9. Rent out your baby gear Strollers, car seats, high chairs, play pens — these are the tools of the stay-at-home parenting trade. They’re expensive and they take up a lot of space in your life. Now there are apps that let you rent out your baby gear to other families in your city and get a little return on those big investments. 10. Check The Penny Hoarder’s Work-From-Home jobs portal If you’re looking for a real job you can do from home, or even if you just want to browse what opportunities are out there, check in regularly with our Work-From-Home Jobs Portal, which is updated regularly with new postings. Many of them can be done from anywhere. Molly Moorhead is a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
1
44

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Pretend Doctor Kit Playset for Kids

click photo for more information
Pretend Doctor Kit Playset for Kids
Fuel your little one’s creative play with this great deal. You can get the Pretend Doctor Kit Playset for Kids for only $14.99. You will be saving 48% on this purchase because it is normally $28.99. Be sure that you grab this deal soon because the price can change at any time! The post Pretend Doctor Kit Playset for Kids appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom. [...]
1
79

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

FREE subscription to Real Simple Magazine + Sports Illustrated for Kids

click photo for more information
FREE subscription to Real Simple Magazine + Sports Illustrated for Kids
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. Yay! This super popular deal on a free subscription to Real Simple magazine has finally returned, plus you can get a free Sports Illustrated subscription, too! I just got a completely FREE subscription to Real Simple Magazine AND a completely free subscription to Sports Illustrated for Kids from Rewards Survey. Here’s how: I signed into my Rewards Survey account (if you don’t have an account, sign up here — it’s free!) I took a short survey that they offered me (it only took me about two minutes). As soon as I took the survey, they offered me $30 in free rewards points that I could spend on a number of different magazine subscriptions. I chose to get Real Simple magazine. You just fill out a simple form and click the “x” in the corner for any additional offers that pop up. After I had ordered my subscription to Real Simple magazine — completely FREE! — I was offered the option to take another survey. So I said yes. I took the second survey (again it only took me less than 2 minutes) and I was offered more magazines I could order for free. I chose to get Sports Illustrated for Kids. Again, I clicked the “x” in the corner for any additional offers that popped up and got the free subscription. Note: I didn’t have to give any card information, so I won’t be billed ever nor will my subscription auto-renew. (Please be sure to NOT put your credit card information in, or you’ll be billed extra charges for extra offers. You should be able to get this freebie without any payment information!) Go sign up and get your free subscriptions! And let me know which magazine subscription(s) you choose! I can’t wait to get my FREE magazines in the mail… and Silas is going to be excited about getting Sports Illustrated for Kids! [...]
1
108

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

10 Ways to Save on National Park Visits with Kids

click photo for more information
10 Ways to Save on National Park Visits with Kids
Guest post from Brigitte of BrigitteBrulz.com Did you know there are over 400 National Park Sites in the United States?! This includes national historic sites, national recreational areas, national sea shores, national monuments, and just over 60 national parks that you can explore with your family. Check out the National Park Service’s website to find one near you (or for your next vacation). Here are 10 ways to save on your next national park adventure! 1. Purchase or Sign Up for an Annual Pass Families who frequent national parks that charge a fee may benefit from an annual pass, which is good for 12 months from the purchase month. Seniors (ages 62+) can take advantage of an annual pass (or even a lifetime pass) aimed specifically at them for an even steeper discount. The senior pass will cover the cost of everyone in a non-commercial vehicle if the site has a per vehicle charge. Great way to enjoy some time with grandkids! Families with a fourth grader can enjoy free entry at hundreds of locations from September through August by getting a free annual pass through the Every Kid in a Park program. Even homeschooling families with a fourth grader can take advantage of this opportunity! Active duty military members can receive free annual passes for many sites for them and their dependents by asking for a U.S. military annual pass. Even if your family has an annual pass, it is still advisable to contact parks ahead of time to ensure the pass is accepted at that location. 2. Go on Free Days If you don’t plan to visit the national parks multiple times in a 12 month span, an annual pass may not make sense for your family. Instead, check to see if they offer any free days. It’s suggested to arrive early and be prepared for large crowds of people on these days! (NOTE: Some national sites are free all year round.) 3. Check the Event’s Calendar Junior Ranger days, astronomy programs, family days, historic days, nature walks, sled dog demonstrations, movies, archaeology days, and photography walks are just a few of the low cost or even free events offered throughout the year at national sites. Schedule your visits accordingly by checking the events calendar. 4. Check out the Junior Ranger Program Kids may enjoy participating in the free Junior Ranger Program where they can complete fun yet educational activities and earn badges at each national park. Even kids who don’t have an opportunity to visit many national parks can earn badges at home by completing booklets about bats, archaeology, caves, the Underground Railroad, and more. 5. Create a Webrangers Account Kids (and even interested adults) can earn virtual badges and rewards as they complete activities while learning about people, history, animals, nature, science, puzzles, and parks through the Webrangers program. Registration is free and simple- just create a user ID and password. Once an account has been created, all of the completed activities are saved so progress can easily be tracked. Kids may even have fun personalizing their own virtual ranger station by choosing a theme and customizing the walls, shelves, chair, desk, floor, picture, and window view. What a great way to get kids excited about visiting National Parks and learning more! 6. Carpool By carpooling with others, you can split the cost of the entrance fee if the site charges a per vehicle fee. 7. Visit the Visitor’s Center Visitor’s centers often provide free maps, guides, suggested tips, exhibits, and even videos to ensure you get the most out of your visit. 8. Talk to Park Rangers Park rangers are often quite knowledgeable about the area and can offer additional suggestions and information about the site. You may even be able to get a personal tour if you ask (particularly on a non-busy day)! 9. Plan Ahead Check out the site’s “plan your visit” section to learn more about fees, hours, things to do, suggestions, and more to make the most out of your visit. It’s helpful to have an idea of what you want to see ahead of time since some parks are so big! Also, check the weather to ensure you are wearing weather-appropriate clothing for the day. 10. Bring Supplies Besides wearing weather-appropriate clothing, comfortable footwear, and a hat, it may be beneficial to bring water, a camera, sunglasses, bug spray, and sunscreen. Finally, don’t take a bag for collecting specimens since it is illegal to remove items from national sites. Instead, bring a bag for any trash you may have and take pictures of all of the neat rocks, shells, and leaves if you want a record of them! What other tips do you have for your next national park adventure? Brigitte Brulz is a homeschooling mom, creator of the Adventure Writing Prompt Journal, author of the book Pickles, Pickles, I Like Pickles, and freelance writer. She offers free coloring pages, activity ideas, and more on her website at BrigitteBrulz.com. [...]
1
109

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Old Navy: Kids Uniform Polos only $3.40, plus more!

click photo for more information
Old Navy: Kids Uniform Polos only $3.40, plus more!
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. Still needing some school clothes? Old Navy has kids uniform polos for only $3.40! Right now, Old Navy is offering up to 60% off kids back to school clothes! Plus, today only, you can get an extra 15% off your order when you use the promo code EXTRA at checkout! Here are some deals you can score… Get Boys or Girls Uniform Polos for just $3.40 after the promo code! Get Boys Jeans for just $6.80 after the promo code! Get Girls Jeans for just $6.80 after the promo code! Choose free in-store pickup to avoid shipping costs. Valid today only, August 21, 2019. Thanks, The Krazy Coupon Lady! [...]
1
157

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

5 Moves to Make If Your Kids’ Extracurriculars Are Busting the Budget

click photo for more information
5 Moves to Make If Your Kids’ Extracurriculars Are Busting the Budget
Extracurricular activities are great for children. They help kids learn new things and perfect their skills. They provide opportunities to bond with peers and a constructive use of time. They look great on college and scholarship applications. But all that enrichment comes at a cost. And these nonessential additions to the household budget can be expensive to keep up with — especially when you have multiple children with multiple interests. Huntington Bank and Communities in Schools’ 2019 Backpack Index estimates extracurricular fees average about $150 for elementary students, $250 for middle school students and $350 for high school students. Of course, there are parents who spend much more. A 2017 Capital One poll found that over a third of those surveyed planned to spend more than $1,000 per kid on extracurricular activities for the school year. If the cost of after-school activities concerns you, consider these ways to make them more affordable. 1. Turn to Government or Nonprofit Programs Before signing your kids up for private music lessons or a traveling sports league, check to see if there are similar offerings located at or sponsored by your local: School Church Library system YMCA Boys and Girls Club Police Athletic League Girl Scouts/Boy Scouts United Way Salvation Army City or county parks and recreation department Community college 2. Ask About Discounts Be thrifty and save where you can by asking the activity provider about discounts. Is there a trial period where you kid can take a class or two for free before signing up for the season? Can you get a discounted rate for being a returning participant, enrolling more than one child or recommending another family to sign up? Some programs offer a reduced rate if you register before a certain date, if you sign up for a package of sessions or if you volunteer to coach. Others offer scholarships or set their prices on a sliding scale based on income. You might want to ask if the organization will allow you to set up a payment plan rather than requiring all the money upfront. Pro Tip Check discount sites like Groupon or Living Social for current deals on activities. 3. Reduce the Associated Costs of After-School Activities The cost to enroll your child in an activity is rarely the only expense you’ll encounter. Equipment, supplies, uniforms, fundraisers, travel and performance tickets can greatly increase your investment. Find ways to lower these additional costs whenever possible. Arrange a carpool with team members. Buy secondhand equipment and attire. Limit the family members who attend smaller performances throughout the year, and save up so everyone can attend the major show at the end of the season. 4. DIY Your Extracurriculars Your kid can get the benefits of participating in an activity without it being a formal program that you pay for. Consider your children’s interests and figure out how to pursue them on an individual scale. If your kid is into music, hit up YouTube for free tutorials. There are tons of cooking blogs with detailed recipes for those who want to master baking. Your library may provide free access to software to learn a foreign language. Tap into your network of family, friends and neighbors to expose your child to different pursuits. Commit to teaching their kids about a skill you’ve mastered in exchange. It might be a bigger investment in time, but you can save a lot of money by creating your own means of developing your child’s interests. FROM THE SAVE MONEY FORUM Travel Tips, anyone have any to share? 8/13/19 @ 10:27 AM For those Who do not drive, what is the cheapest way to get around? 8/15/19 @ 9:55 PM M How to save when grocery shopping 8/15/19 @ 10:43 AM Acorns 8/14/19 @ 2:00 PM See more in Save Money or ask a money question 5. Talk to Your Kids About Making Sacrifices There may be times where you simply have to say no to your kid’s request to enroll in another extracurricular activity. If you don’t have the funds and you’d have to charge expenses on a credit card, you should reevaluate things. Parents never want to put financial stress on their kids, but it’s okay to be up-front about the limitations of your budget. This might mean having your kids choose one sport to commit to rather than two, or asking if they prefer dance lessons over vacationing at the beach next summer. If you have teenagers, get them to contribute to their extracurricular expenses with money from babysitting, mowing lawns or a part-time job. Depending on the activity, you can challenge your child to turn their hobby into an entrepreneurial pursuit — like selling handmade bracelets at local festivals or giving piano lessons to younger kids. Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. She’s a parent who’s always looking for ways to save money. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
1
292

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Up to 70% off New Balance Kids Shoes + $1 Shipping!

click photo for more information
Up to 70% off New Balance Kids Shoes + $1 Shipping!
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. Do your kids need new shoes for school? Joe’s New Balance is offering up to 70% off kids shoes right now! Through August 15th, Joe’s New Balance is offering up to 70% off shoes! Plus, you can score an extra 15% off final markdowns. No promo code needed. Even better, shipping is only $1 when you use the promo code DOLLARship at checkout. Here are some deal ideas… New Balance Girls 775 Shoes – $18 (regularly $59.99) Use promo code DOLLARSHIP ($1 shipping) $19 shipped after promo code New Balance Girls Shoes – $13.50 (regularly $44.99) Use promo code DOLLARSHIP ($1 shipping) $14.50 shipped after promo code New Balance Kids Core Hook and Loop Shoes – $16.50 (regularly $54.99) Use promo code DOLLARSHIP ($1 shipping) $17.50 shipped after promo code New Balance Girls Shoes – $22.49 (regularly $44.99) Use promo code DOLLARSHIP ($1 shipping) $23.49 shipped after promo code New Balance Girls Fresh Foam Sport Shoes – $27.49 (regularly $54.99) Use promo code DOLLARSHIP ($1 shipping) $28.49 shipped after promo code New Balance Boys Shoes – $22.49 (regularly $44.99) Use promo code DOLLARSHIP ($1 shipping) $23.49 shipped after promo code New Balance Boys Spring Canvas Pack Shoes – $24.99 (regularly $49.99) Use promo code DOLLARSHIP ($1 shipping) $25.99 shipped after promo code Valid through August 15, 2019. Thanks, Hip2Save! [...]
1
117

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Back-to-School Shopping: Kids Influenced by Social Media Push Parents to Overspend

click photo for more information
Back-to-School Shopping: Kids Influenced by Social Media Push Parents to Overspend
Kids pushing their parents for the coolest in back-to-school gear is a late-summer tradition, and today, youngsters have some backup: social media influencers. Peer and social media influences on children are not news unto themselves, but it turns out these factors are affecting how parents spend their back-to-school dollars, according to a new NerdWallet survey... Elizabeth Renter is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: elizabeth@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @elizabethrenter. The article Back-to-School Shopping: Kids Influenced by Social Media Push Parents to Overspend originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
1
144

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

How I Stopped Yelling at My Kids

click photo for more information
How I Stopped Yelling at My Kids
Want to stop yelling at your kids? In this post, I share what has helped me to stop yelling at my kids and practical ways to love more and yell less. How I Stopped Yelling at My Kids I thought I was a patient person… then I had kids. I said I’d never yell at my kids… and then I had kids. I pictured myself as a sweet, loving, always-cheerful mom… then I had kids. Motherhood has stretched me and humbled me. It’s brought out the best in me and the worst in me. About five years ago, I found myself snapping at my kids more and more frequently, which only served to frustrate me. The more I snapped at my kids, the more frustrated I was at myself. And the more frustrated I was at myself, the more I’d snap at my kids. It was a vicious cycle and I felt trapped. One night, I was up late thinking of the kind of mom I’d been and feeling so ashamed of my behavior and the example I was setting before my kids. I started praying and asking God to help me to love my children, to help me have patience with them, and to stop getting so angry with them. My 4-Week Commitment As I was praying, an idea birthed in my head. I decided to make a commitment to my husband for the next 4 weeks. I woke Jesse up to tell him my commitment (I have such a gracious husband — poor guy!). It was this: every time I was tempted to lash out at a child I would, instead, find a very practical way to love that child. It was a BIG commitment, but he agreed that he thought I could do it and said he was willing to hold me accountable. I went to bed resolving that, by God’s grace, I was going to change the tone in our home. It Was SO Hard The first day was very, very hard. One child in particular was pushing all of my buttons and seeming to make a game of trying to see how much they could annoy me. Well, the first few hours on that first day of my 4-week commitment, this child tried all their usual tactics. I didn’t get frustrated. I didn’t yell. I didn’t even raise my voice. Oh, it was very hard. But I’m a stubborn person and I was determined to stick with my commitment to my husband. Instead, of lashing out, I asked this child to come snuggle next to me. I poured love, love, and more love. The Change Was Amazing! Within a few hours, this child’s attitude had drastically changed. They were calm, happy, and asking what they could do to help me. I could not believe it! And this only continued for the next few days. Until finally, I felt like I almost had a completely different child living in my home. It was amazing! I decided my 4-week experiment was a smashing success. And I decided to extend it for another 40 years. Or something like that. 🙂 Five Years Later I wrote most of the above five years ago and I wanted to give an update for those who may have read my original post on this. I can safely say that this one change in me has changed the tone in our whole home. My children are more helpful and respectful. I am so much happier. Jesse is happier because we’re happier. And our home is much, much calmer. All because I’m choosing to love instead of lash out. Lean in and Love Now, let me be honest: I haven’t always done it perfectly and I occasionally revert back to my old ways of getting frustrated. But when I start to feel the frustration and anger rising, I remember my mantra, “Lean in and love.” When I want to lash out, lean in and love. When I want to express my frustration, lean in and love. When that child is getting on my every last nerve, lean in and love. Practical Ways to Love More Instead of Lashing Out 1. Invite your child to sit with you. I’ve noticed that when my children are frustrated and acting out, it’s often because they are craving attention and affection. Inviting a child to come sit next to me when they are getting on my every last nerve can be so hard for me to do. In fact, I usually want them to be as far away from me as possible. But distance is only going to make matters worse. Lovingly and gently asking my child to come sit next to me and be with me helps to calm both of us. It helps me to communicate love for the child (even if I don’t feel all that loving at the time) and it causes the child to feel special and cared for. 2. Stop, look, and listen. Moms, we can get so busy with life. We have places to go, things to do, messes to clean up, meals to fix… the list is never ending. Our kids don’t need our productivity. They need our presence. If a child is misbehaving, don’t shush them just so you can get back to what you were doing. Stop, look into their eyes, and gently ask them, “Is everything okay?” Or, “What’s wrong?” Really mean it. And then really listen to their answer. Taking time to do this — even in the middle of a very busy day — has made a world of difference in our home. 3. Pray With Your Child When Silas is struggling, I’ll often ask him if I can pray for him. He always says yes and then calms down while I pray with him asking God to help him be calm, obey, love his sisters, or whatever it is that he’s struggling with. Usually, by the end of my prayer, he’s calmed down and in a much better mood. I think, for him, my willingness to take time to pray with him helps him to feel loved. It also communicates to him that we need God’s help in our everyday life — especially when we’re struggling. Diana from My Humble Kitchen once shared me with that when she’s struggling to respond with kindness and gentleness to her children, she’ll ask them to gather around and pray for her. She said that it’s basically impossible to respond in anger after your children have gathered around you and prayed for you! I definitely plan to try this soon! 4. Go Outside & Take a Walk Together If you feel like things are about to explode inside the walls of your house, call everyone together and tell them you’re taking a walk in 5 minutes. (Or, make it a family bike ride if you have older children.) Exercise and fresh air can do wonders when things are uptight! Plus, a fresh change of scenery can provide a better setting for talking through issues in a calmer manner. Don’t forget to stop and smell the roses along the way, breathe in the fresh air, soak up the sunshine, and notice the beauty around you. This will boost your spirits for the tasks that lay ahead of you the rest of the day! 5. Share Three Things You’re Thankful For As I often say, “There is always, always, always something to be thankful for.” But sometimes we can get bogged down by all the problems, stresses, and struggles that we forget to count our blessings. In those moments when you want to yell and be frustrated with your kids, challenge yourself to stop, breathe, and call your children together and each share three things you’re thankful for. This might seem really difficult at first if everyone is at odds with everyone else, but force yourself to do this and it will most likely change the tone in your home. Plus, it might help you step back and gain some perspective: in light of all you have to be grateful for, the small things that someone is doing to irritate you won’t seem so upsetting.  6) Do Something Fun If you have young children, this can be especially helpful to do on a hard day. When things feel like they are falling apart, set aside your to-do list and plans for the afternoon or evening and have a tea party, a family game night, a family movie night, or go do something fun as a family. Sit down, smile, and just enjoy your children. Take time to laugh together, read a story (or tell stories!), and maybe also talk to them about how they are feeling about life, things they are struggling with, or even some encouragement for them in some areas they need to improve in. 7) Put Yourself In Your Child’s Shoes It’s so easy for us to forget that our kids are often carrying heavy burdens, too. Sometimes, we can [...]
1
197

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Kids’ Birkenstocks only $29.99 + shipping!

click photo for more information
Kids’ Birkenstocks only $29.99 + shipping!
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. Wow! Proozy is having a big sale on kids’ Birkenstocks right now! Need back to school shoes for the kids? Proozy is offering Kids’ Birkenstocks for just $29.99 when you use the promo code MSM2999 at checkout! There are lots of styles and colors to choose from! Pay $5.95 for shipping or get FREE shipping on orders over $50! (Go in with a friend for two pairs to save on shipping!) Valid through August 6, 2019. Psst! Want to save more on kids’ back to school clothing? Be sure to check out these great tips! Be sure to check out all of the Best 2019 Back To School Deals! Don’t forget you can also sign up for our daily email newsletter to get all of the best back to school deals emailed to you every week! And be sure to check out my post on 5 Simple Ways to Save on Back to School Deals. [...]
1
170

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Curious Chef Kids 6-Piece Fruit and Veggie Prep Kit

click photo for more information
Curious Chef Kids 6-Piece Fruit and Veggie Prep Kit
These are adorable and such a great idea for little ones that are ready to start helping out in the kitchen. You can grab the Curious Chef Kids 6-Piece Fruit and Veggie Prep Kit for only $19.99! You will be saving 33% on this purchase because it is normally $29.99. This set includes a vegetable ... Read More about Curious Chef Kids 6-Piece Fruit and Veggie Prep Kit The post Curious Chef Kids 6-Piece Fruit and Veggie Prep Kit appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom. [...]
1
125

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Read Up, Parents! 14 Simple Ways to Get Free Kids’ Books

click photo for more information
Read Up, Parents! 14 Simple Ways to Get Free Kids’ Books
Some of the links in this post are from our sponsors. We provide you with accurate, reliable information. Learn more about how we make money and select our advertising partners. What’s better than curling up with a good book? Or, better yet, a series of books? “Little House on the Prairie,” “The Baby-Sitters Club” or “The Boxcar Children,” anyone? But books can get pricy. How can you find books for your little ones to read without spending a fortune? By getting free books, of course. While it’s great to support authors whenever possible, sometimes buying new books just isn’t in the family budget — and you don’t want to deprive your kids of the love of reading How to Get Free Books for Kids Use these strategies to get free books for kids. Some are physical books and others are PDFs or ebooks, but they all offer great ways to give kids access to a wide variety of reading material — without spending a cent. 1. Imagination Library Dolly Parton loves reading so much, she wants every child to have the opportunity. In 1995, the country music superstar started Imagination Library to give free books to children in her home county in Tennessee. She wanted to help preschool-aged children develop a love of reading, even if their families couldn’t afford books. In 2000, she expanded the program, partnering with local communities to send more than 60 million books to kids in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Local partners include preschool programs, libraries and service organizations along with many other groups. To get free books for your child, check the program availability in your area, then follow the instructions to get registered. 2. Free Kids Books Download free PDFs from this online library of kids’ books. With picture books for toddlers, books with pictures and words for bigger kids and chapter books for young adults, this site has something for everyone. You can even get coloring books. The site recommends printing the PDFs and stapling the pages together — or reading them on a tablet or other electronic device. Titles include classics like “The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse” by Beatrix Potter and  newer ones like “Wilbur the Lost Whale,” about a whale who reunites with his family in a conservation area. 3. Barnes & Noble Summer Reading Program Kids in first through sixth grades can earn a free book by filling out the Summer Reading Journal. Just have your kids read eight books and write about their favorite parts of each one in the journal. Bring the journal into a local Barnes & Noble between Aug. 1 and Aug. 31, and your kids can pick out a book from a selected list. 4. Read Conmigo Immerse your children in pre-k through fifth grade bilingual reading by signing up for Read Conmigo. If you live in California, Florida or Texas, the program will mail you a book every four months. Online resources like bilingual activities and educational tools are available to everyone, regardless of location. The program also offers free ebooks that are compatible with most Apple iOS, Amazon Kindle and Android devices. More than 108,000 parents have signed up for the program since it started in 2011. 5. Little Free Libraries Neighborhoods all over the country are adding Little Free Libraries. These small shelves allow people to share books and always have something new to read. Find a free library near you, leave a book you’ve finished and grab a new one to share. Different libraries will have different offerings. 6. Craigslist, Freecycle and Facebook If you’re looking for some kids’ books, why not put up a “wanted” post on Craigslist, Freecycle or even Facebook? Plenty of people have books they’re not using and would be happy to share, but it’s not on their minds unless you ask. 7. Libraries Of course, your local public library has plenty of books to borrow for free. This is a great option for families who like to constantly switch up their reading selections. But some libraries will even have books you can keep, such as older books they’re planning on tossing out. Ask your local librarian if they may have any available. FROM THE SAVE MONEY FORUM Do You Ever Pick up A Stray Penny? 2/7/19 @ 5:27 PM Do drive-in movie theaters save you money? 7/1/19 @ 7:38 PM What to buy (and not buy) from Fourth of July Sales 2019 6/27/19 @ 1:00 PM M Airfare 6/24/19 @ 5:19 PM See more in Save Money or ask a money question How to Get Free Online Books for Kids Ebooks are increasingly becoming more popular with readers, and that includes young ones.  Here are several sites where you can find free online books for kids. 8. Amazon Free Books Amazon has a ton of free kids’ books available for Kindle downloads. Just search for “children’s books, Kindle edition” and sort price “low to high” to see all the freebies. Plenty of books are available to download, from “Wiggly the Worm” to “Diary of a Private School Kid.”  A couple of other sites also make it easy to find free kids books in Kindle format, including eReaderIQ and Goodreads. 9. Amazon Prime Kindle Owners’ Lending Library Amazon Prime members can borrow books for free through the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, which allows users to borrow one book each calendar month. The program offers a wide range of kids’ books to pick from, but you’ll need a Kindle (and a Prime membership) to read them. 10. Project Gutenberg While mostly for older kids, Project Gutenberg has a wealth of free downloads available. Type “children” in the search field and classic kids’ books will appear, from “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” to “Peter Pan” to “Anne of Green Gables” and many other favorites. The site offers a total of over 59,000 ebooks to download for free, including many books for kids. 11. ManyBooks Launched in 2004, ManyBooks aims to create an extensive library of digital books that are available for free on the internet. The site adds new books on a near-daily basis, including an entire section dedicated to kids’ books The books are available for download in a variety of formats and can also be read on the site itself using ManyBooks’ online ereader. 12. Free Children Stories The founders of Free Children Stories set up the site in 2008 as a way of offering quality storytelling to every child, parent or teacher with internet access. The site has a variety of books for all ages, and even offers audio readings of the books for kids who like having a grown-up read to them. 13. Read.gov The Library of Congress has put dozens of classic kids books online for free, including “Anne of Green Gables” and “White Fang.” The ebooks can be read using the Library’s online e-reader, and the ebooks themselves are scans of the original books held in the library’s collection. 14. International Children’s Digital Library The International Children’s Digital Library was established to provide a collection of digital children’s books from around the world. It contains more than 4,600 books in 59 languages, including Spanish, French, Farsi and even Mongolian. Kristen Pope is a freelance writer and editor in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Editor Caitlin Constantine contributed to this post. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, wh [...]
1
136

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Give Your Kids the Gift of a Good Credit Score by Adding Them to Your Card

click photo for more information
Give Your Kids the Gift of a Good Credit Score by Adding Them to Your Card
Teaching your kids how to fail is one of those underrated parenting skills. By making mistakes in a controlled, safe environment, kids can learn coping skills before they incur real-world consequences. That’s particularly true when it comes to teaching kids about finance. Those lessons can have an important impact on your child’s future. A Penny Hoarder survey found that one-third of adult respondents did not grow up discussing basic personal finance topics, such as credit scores or debt. The result? For those with no early financial literacy, 40% had no savings at all, compared to 17% for the group that did discuss finances. One important lesson that you can teach your kids is how to use credit responsibly — before they get credit cards of their own.  Wondering if you should get your pride and joy a credit card? Here’s why and how to do it so they can learn how to handle credit responsibly. Should Your Kid Get a Credit Card? Although it might not seem like a priority, getting your child a credit card helps them build credit history. Pro Tip You can help protect your child’s credit score from identity theft by checking their score periodically, or at least by the time they turn 15, when the score may become more relevant. Credit history makes up 15% of your credit score, which will become important to your kids in the future if they want to finance a car, buy a house or possibly even get a job. And unlike other factors — like credit utilization or credit mix— there’s no way to improve your credit history other than with time.  But simply allowing your child to sign up for a credit card presents two problems:  They may not be ready for the responsibility of handling credit and could end up thousands of dollars in debt, thus wrecking the credit score you wanted them to build. They probably can’t qualify for a card … because they don’t have a credit history. That’s where you come in. You can cosign on your child’s credit card or even consider adding your child to your credit card to build credit. Which one should you choose? Should You Be a Cosigner or Make Your Child an Authorized User? Choosing between becoming a cosigner or making your child an authorized user starts with their age — you cannot apply for a credit card until you’re at least 18 years old, so that’s the earliest age you could be their cosigner. But becoming a cosigner on your older teen’s credit card makes you legally responsible for the debt if they miss a payment, according to Todd Christensen, an Accredited Financial Counselor and education manager with MoneyFit.org.  “The problem is, cosigners are not usually 100% involved in the billing process — they do not see, typically, the monthly bill,” he said. “So often, a cosigner will be contacted six to 12 months after a payment is missed, and then be requested to make all the back payments plus fees, and this is in the meantime hurting their credit.” Pro Tip The CARD Act of 2009 made it more difficult for people under 21 to get a credit card. However, there are plenty of cards that are marketed specifically to college students who can prove they can pay. Adding your child as an authorized user means they aren’t receiving the privileges (or reward points) of having their own card — they’re essentially just carrying your card. For most issuers, an authorized user doesn’t even get a separate credit card number. That also means your kids are depending on your credit history to build theirs. If your payment record isn’t so great or you have concerns about your ability to keep up with your credit card balance, you way want to consider the cosigner option when your kids get older. But if you’re ready to teach your kids by showing them what a responsible card holder looks like (that’s you), adding them as an authorized user is the better choice. Here’s why. Adding Your Child to Your Credit Card to Build Credit  By adding your child as an authorized user on your card, they can learn to handle a credit card in a low-risk way.  “It’s a great opportunity to build credit,” Christensen said. “It doesn’t cost [parents] anything. It doesn’t affect their credit at all.” The minimum age for adding your child to your credit card depends on your credit card company — many have no minimum age requirements at all — and some premium cards charge a fee for adding an authorized user, so check your issuer’s terms and conditions before adding your child. Pro Tip Seven years is typically the amount of time needed to establish a good credit history, so adding a very young child as an authorized user won’t do much to help their score. “I typically recommend it especially in the late teens,” Christensen advised. You can track your child’s spending instantaneously by setting up text alert messages for all credit card transactions or less frequently by checking your account activity daily. Still unsure if you can trust your kid with the plastic? You don’t actually need to tell them they’re getting the card.  “I’ve done that with my own kids,” Christensen said. “I had them as an authorized user on my wife’s and my card for several years, and they never knew it until they turned 18.” FROM THE DEBT FORUM Travel Trailer Debt 6/25/19 @ 5:31 PM Suze Orman says CAR LEASES are always a BAD financial move - do you agree? 4/18/19 @ 3:47 PM debt from a scam/fraud 6/18/19 @ 6:57 PM C credit card trouble again 6/24/19 @ 5:20 PM a See more in Debt or ask a money question Even though his daughter wasn’t aware she was building her credit history, Christensen noted that she ended up reaping the benefits of having that credit history. “When my daughter went to apply for a car loan after she moved out, one of the credit ratings had her in the 700s because she was an authorized user on our accounts,” he said. Additionally, if you’re using the card to teach your older kids about handling credit cards responsibly, by allowing them to be authorized users on your card, they can reap the benefits of building credit — and make a mistake without putting your own score in danger. Pro Tip As long as your child uses the card responsibly, don’t remove them as an authorized user until they get their own credit card and have had a few years to build that credit history. “If their credit goes south, it should not make it onto [your] credit rating,” Christensen said. “But even if it did, a simple dispute online will have it removed.” Ready to give your kids the chance to learn but aren’t sure where to start? Check out The Penny Hoarder Academy’s Credit Cards 101 course and this post on how to use a credit card as guides for teaching them about using credit in a responsible way. Tiffany Wendeln Connors is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. Read her bio and other work here, then catch her on Twitter @TiffanyWendeln. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
1
247

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Piggy Banks vs. Banking Apps: Teaching Kids About Money in the Digital Age

click photo for more information
Piggy Banks vs. Banking Apps: Teaching Kids About Money in the Digital Age
When you buy food with a swipe of a card and pay bills with a click of a button, what are your kids learning about money? “It is getting harder and harder to teach our kids about money and finance in the digital world because there’s just not as much opportunity to interact with money,” said Liz Frazier, a New York-based financial planner and author of the upcoming book “Beyond Piggy Banks and Lemonade Stands.” In a world of neat budgeting apps and debit cards for kids, Frazier recommends sticking with the basics — at least initially. Start kids on the three piggy bank system — one for spending, one for saving, one for sharing. Frazier uses simple clear jars so they can see their money grow. Children also learn about money by watching their parents. While swiping a debit card at the store makes sense to you, kids don’t concretely view that transaction as spending money. “As parents, we should try to expose [children] to real money whenever we can,” she said. For those who don’t regularly carry around cash, this is easier said than done. Frazier recommends starting off with smaller purchases like coffee or lunch at a restaurant. Show your kids the bill, help them count out money for payment and ask them to check if they received the correct change. When you aren’t using physical money — like when you use a debit card for groceries or a check for a school fundraiser — treat those moments as opportunities to advance the money conversation. “Start explaining the differences between what payment method you’re using — the debit card, credit card and cash — as you’re using it,” Frazier said. “They’re not going to totally understand everything in the beginning, but you just want to get them comfortable with the product.” Once you feel your child has an understanding of money basics and has had plenty of interaction with physical cash, opening a bank account for your kid can serve as a good transition to working with online tools and digital transactions. Fight the temptation to start an online account from the convenience of home. Visiting a brick-and-mortar bank or credit union is a better learning experience, Frazier said. “Go to the bank together and have the banker explain to your child that you’re opening up an account,” she said. “At this point you can get a debit card and start using it together at the store or getting out money at the ATM. You can also look at the statements every month, or every week if you want to, and walk through what money you put in [and] what you took out.” Opening a savings account is a good opportunity to introduce your kids to the concept of interest — how their money increases when they let their savings sit. Pro Tip When introducing your kids to money management apps, Frazier recommends including them in the research to find one that is established, secure and engaging. Conversations about money lessons for kids should stay positive and focus on useful information. If money stresses you out, do your best not to convey that to your children. Instead focus on the lessons you’ve learned from your financial mistakes. And don’t forget to tell your kids about your success and what goals you have. It’s Never Too Late to Provide Money Lessons for Kids Speaking of financial mistakes, Frazier said exposing your kids to money at an early age allows them to make mistakes when they’re young enough that the consequences aren’t so weighty. Maybe they spend all their money on a trendy gadget that turns out to be a dud, or they give in to an impulse purchase that sets them back from saving for something they really want. The fallback from those choices isn’t as devastating as not having any savings when an emergency pops up as an adult. FROM THE BUDGETING FORUM Budgeting as a Couple 5/10/19 @ 7:21 PM How to get better coupons 4/30/19 @ 9:41 PM Have you tried the Zero Based budgeting method? 6/7/19 @ 9:58 AM Teacher Budgeting for the Summer 5/22/19 @ 9:18 AM See more in Budgeting or ask a money question If you’ve missed out on teaching your kids about money in kindergarten and now they’re in their teenage years, it isn’t too late to start having personal finance discussions. As a financial planner, Frazier sees the negative consequences that come from people not being taught about money. The Penny Hoarder conducted a financial literacy survey in March and found that adults who didn’t grow up learning about money made less income and had less savings than those who were exposed to financial literacy growing up. Teaching your kids about money is the best gift you can give your children, Frazier said. “They are going to learn it one way or the other so you want them to learn it the right way,” she said. Key Takeaways Give your children experiences with tangible money. Include your kids in conversations about financial decisions. Open a bank account for your kids to transition them to the world of digital finance. Share your personal lessons, successes and goals with your children. Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. She already talks to her 4-year-old about money. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
1
313

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?

Summer Movies for Kids | 2019 Discounts and Deals!

click photo for more information
Summer Movies for Kids | 2019 Discounts and Deals!
Looking for some frugal fun for the kiddos this summer? Be sure to check out this round-up of all the best discounts on summer movies for kids! {Looking for other fun summer deals? Don’t miss our round-up of the best Summer Reading Programs! Plus, kids can bowl for free and skate for free at many participating locations this summer! And don’t forget to stop by Sonic after 8 p.m. for half-price ice cream shakes!} Summer Movies for Kids 2019 If you’re looking for a great way to have some frugal fun with your kids this summer, then be sure to check out this list of discounts on kids’ movies! Regal Cinemas — Each Tuesday and Wednesday at 10 a.m., participating Regal Cinemas are offering moviegoers of all ages a selection of G or PG-rated films for just $1! Valid through September 4, 2019. Cinemark Theaters — Participating Cinemark theaters are offering a 10-Week Cinemark Summer Movie Clubhouse promotion. If you purchase in advance at the Box Office, then you can get up to 10 tickets to select G- or PG-rated movies for just $5 — which makes it just $0.50 per movie! Valid from May 27 – September 8, 2019. AMC Theaters — AMC Theaters will be offering a kid’s movie ticket and AMC KidsPack for just $4 every Wednesday at 10 a.m. over the summer! The KidsPack includes kid’s popcorn, fountain drink, and FrootiTooti fruit snacks. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema — Kids ages 3+ can enjoy family favorite films for just $1, $3, or $5 – your choice! Movies screen daily at 10:30am. Cineplex — Participaint Cineplex Theaters are offering family favorite films each Saturday morning at 11 a.m. for just $2.99 per film! Classic Cinemas — Watch PG-rated films for just $1 at 10 a.m. every Wednesday! Also, be sure to arrive early at 9 a.m. so you can meet some of your favorite characters and join in on the fun games & activities! Valid June 5 – August 7, 2019. Marcus Theaters — View your favorite family flicks for just $3 on Sundays, Mondays and Wednesdays, June 16 – August 14, 2019. Additionally, popcorn and fountain drinks will be just $2.75 each! Studio Movie Grille — Escape the summer heat and watch $1 screenings of recent, popular, children films through August 30, 2019. Harkins Theaters — Kids can enjoy a movie each week for 10 weeks, for less than $1 per film. Price varies by the theater, but ranges from $5 to $7 for the whole summer. Paragon Theaters — Enjoy free kids movies at 10 a.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from June 11 – August 8, 2019. Metropolitan Theatres — Summer Kids Film Series will be taking place on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. for just $2 per movie. Paseo Nuevo and Metrolux 14 also have shows on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 10 a.m., and Camino Real has shows every Thursday. Cobb Theatres — Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 10 a.m. kids can enjoy free movies! Doors open at 9:30 a.m. and tickets are valid for same day only. Megaplex Theatres — Megaplex Theatres is offering young fans and their families a fun summer filled with a movie pass! See 10 movies for just $10. Bowtie Cinemas — Kids can see a free movie on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 10 a.m. from June 25th through August 21st. Phoenix Theatres — See a free movie each Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday at 10 a.m.. Doors open at 9 a.m. and all age groups are welcome. In addition, they will be offering a special Kiddie Meal! Georgia Theatre Company — Participating Georgia Theatre Company locations are offering a Summer Kid Show Series at 10 a.m. every Tuesday and Thursday in June and July! Admission is just $1.50! Also, get drinks and popcorn for just $1.50 each! Ultra Star Cinemas –– Kids can see a movie Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. for just $1 per film! Do you know of any other discounts on summer movies for kids? Let us know if we missed any! Thanks, Hip2Save! [...]
1
254

Favorite! Would you like to add notes/tags?