These Are the Tax Brackets for 2020 (Plus 4 Tax Changes to Know About)

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These Are the Tax Brackets for 2020 (Plus 4 Tax Changes to Know About)
The year 2020 is looking a lot like 2019, at least in terms of taxes. The IRS just released its inflation adjustments for 2020 federal income tax rates and brackets. While these changes are unlikely to have a huge impact on your bottom line, there are a few things you should be aware of heading into the new year. Because these are the 2020 tax rates, they’ll determine your tax bill that will be due in 2021. You’ll use 2019 rates and brackets when you file your taxes on or before April 15, 2020. How the 2020 Tax Brackets Break Down There are seven tax brackets that range from 10% to 37%. The 2020 tax brackets break down as follows: Unmarried Individuals Tax Bracket Taxable Income 10% Up to $9,875 12% $9,875 to $40,125 22% $40,125 to $85,525 24% $85,525 to $163,300 32% $163,300 to $207,350 35% $207,350 to $518,400 37% Over $518,400 Married Individuals Filing Jointly or Surviving Spouses Tax Bracket Taxable Income 10% Up to $19,750 12% $19,750 to $80,250 22% $80,250 to $171,050 24% $171,050 to $326,600 32% $326,600 to $414,700 35% $414,700 to $622,050 37% Over $622,050 Heads of Household Tax Bracket Taxable Income 10% Up to $14,100 12% $14,100 to $53,700 22% $53,700 to $85,500 24% $85,500 to $163,300 32% $163,300 to $207,350 35% $207,350 to $518,400 37% Over $518,400 Pro Tip Not sure of your filing status? This interactive IRS quiz can help you determine the correct status. If you qualify for more than one, it tells you which one will result in the lowest tax bill. Tax rates apply to the income within each bracket. So if you’re an unmarried individual with taxable income of $50,000, you won’t pay 22% of that $50,000 to Uncle Sam. According to the 2020 tax brackets, you’d pay: 10% on the first $9,875 12% on the next $30,250 ($40,125 – $9,875 = $30,250) 22% on the next $9,875 ($50,000 – $40,125 = $9,875) 4 Tax Changes That Could Affect You in 2020 The modified tax brackets aren’t the only changes the IRS announced. About 60 tax provisions will be adjusted in the new year. A few highlights: The standard deduction will rise slightly: The standard deduction will rise by $200 to $12,400 for people who are single filers or married filing separately. For those who are married filing jointly, the standard deduction will rise by $400 to $24,800. You may be able to save an extra $500 for retirement: If you have an employer-sponsored tax-deferred retirement plan, like a 401(k) or 403(b), your maximum contribution is $19,500 in 2020, up from $19,000 in 2019. The additional “catch-up” contribution workers ages 50 and older can make will also go up by $500, from $6,000 to $6,500. You can contribute an extra $50 to a flexible spending account. In 2020, the maximum contribution individuals can contribute is $2,750. Some limited-income families can get an extra $103. The maximum Earned Income Tax Credit will increase to $6,660. You need at least three children to qualify for the maximum amount. 3 Tax Rules That Aren’t Changing in 2020 IRA contribution limits won’t change. The traditional and Roth IRA contribution limits will remain at $6,000 for people under 50. The extra $1,000 “catch-up” contribution the IRS allows people 50 and older to make won’t change either. You can still gift someone up to $15,000 without paying the federal gift tax. The gift tax exemption is something you might want to take advantage of if you’re contributing to a 529 plan. There’s no limit on itemized deductions. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 suspended these limits. Ready to Start Your 2020 Tax Prep? OK, we get it: You’re probably not thinking about your 2020 taxes yet. After all, you haven’t even had your 2019 Thanksgiving turkey. But if you’re the plan-ahead type, you can check out this comprehensive summary of 2020 tax changes courtesy of the IRS. Even if you’re not ready to jump into 2020 tax planning mode just yet, keep in mind that a new year is often a good time to check your tax withholdings and make adjustments if necessary. So make a date with yourself in early January for a quick tax checkup. Robin Hartill is a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder. She edits and writes stories about bank accounts, credit scores, home buying, insurance, investing, retirement and taxes. She is also the voice behind the Dear Penny personal advice column, which is syndicated in the Tampa Bay Times Sunday business section. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
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My Favorite Thing About Fall — Clothes! #WearBlairWell

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My Favorite Thing About Fall — Clothes! #WearBlairWell
This is a sponsored post on behalf of Blair.  All opinions are my own. I don’t know about you, but I am thrilled fall is finally here!  No more scorching summer days, we are back to our routine, and the colors are gorgeous. But that is not all I love about fall. I love the ... Read More about My Favorite Thing About Fall — Clothes! #WearBlairWell The post My Favorite Thing About Fall — Clothes! #WearBlairWell appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom. [...]
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Talking to David Siegel about Libra, Austrian Economics and Cryptocurrencies

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Talking to David Siegel about Libra, Austrian Economics and Cryptocurrencies
Our aim at Daily Fintech is to be a decentralized think tank where we get a diversity of opinions from around the world. One person whose thinking I have long admired is David Siegel. Even when I disagree with him, I always learn a lot, so we thought that the Daily Fintech community would benefit […] The post Talking to David Siegel about Libra, Austrian Economics and Cryptocurrencies appeared first on Daily Fintech. [...]
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Derek Peth of ‘Bachelor in Paradise’: It’s OK to Talk About Money with Friends

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Derek Peth of ‘Bachelor in Paradise’: It’s OK to Talk About Money with Friends
Trying to maintain a social life while still paying the bills? That’s easier said than done. Bar tabs, brunches, vacations and birthday celebrations don’t pay down student loans or help you save for a down payment on a home. If you’re not a careful budgeter, your social spending can even put you behind on rent. But that doesn’t mean you have to isolate yourself. Derek Peth, a financial executive who’s most known for stints on “The Bachelorette” and “Bachelor in Paradise,” suggests the opposite. Becoming more financially intimate — sharing your financial situation with your friends or significant other — can strengthen your relationships while protecting your budget. Peth, a senior vice president at the online lender Laurel Road, told The Penny Hoarder it’s time to remove the taboo around talking about money. “Your finances are a part of who you are,” he said. The people you love should be accepting of that, even if it prohibits you from going out and spending money as often as they’d like. Talking about your financial situation, however, doesn’t mean you have to dish out the explicit details of how much you make or how much debt you have to an acquaintance or someone you just started dating. Instead, Peth suggests sharing your goals and limits.  “You can say something like, ‘I’ve got a lot in student loans. I’m really trying to focus on that and my goals right now, and I’m kind of limited on what I can do. Here’s my limits,’” he said. “You don’t necessarily [have to] put numbers behind it, but at least start having the conversation.” While you’re being more open about your money situation, make sure to share your financial wins too. Paying off $10,000 of your student debt is worthy of the type of celebration you’d have if a friend was turning 30, Peth said. “Achieving something like paying off a large amount of debt and then celebrating it in a fun way is something that we should do more of,” he said. When you don’t have as much disposable income as your friends, it can be disappointing to say no to an invite. “FOMO is a real thing,” Peth said. True friends should accept the occasional “no thanks, I can’t make it” reply. If someone is constantly trying to push you outside your financial comfort zone or can’t accept your explanations as to why you can’t afford going out every weekend, Peth said it may be time to re-evaluate the relationship. “You don’t want to be begrudgingly doing something and you also don’t want to — if you’re real friends — be guilt-tripping someone into doing something either,” he said. FROM THE BUDGETING FORUM Have you tried the Zero Based budgeting method? 6/7/19 @ 1:58 PM Money management in general 9/17/19 @ 12:59 PM J Out on sick leave 9/19/19 @ 5:48 PM See more in Budgeting or ask a money question To avoid some of these situations, Peth advises taking the lead and being the one to plan the outing. You can come up with something enjoyable that doesn’t involve spending a bunch of money, like a backyard barbecue or a picnic where everyone chips in and brings a dish. Living in New York, Peth said some of his favorite things to do are hanging with friends on a rooftop or in Central Park, which are very low-cost. When it comes to dating, Peth suggests taking a note from the Bachelor franchise — with adjustments to fit your budget, of course. “There are multiple layers to their big dates,” he said. “Although they’re crazy expensive, you can start out somewhere that’s got nice drinks, grab one there, walk to another place that’s maybe lower cost to get tacos together and just laugh and chat, and then go through a final walk through some park.” Adding layers to a date involves a little more effort than just making reservations at a restaurant. Peth said it shows you value spending time with that person, and the change of scenery helps break up some first-date awkwardness.  “The first time you’re meeting somebody, mix it up a little bit,” he said. Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
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5 Things to Know About the Key Cashback Credit Card

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5 Things to Know About the Key Cashback Credit Card
The Key Cashback credit card, issued by KeyBank, has an annual fee of $0 and features an appealing 2% cash back on every purchase, an ongoing flat rate that’s hard to beat. But there are some catches for that high rate: You will earn it only under certain conditions, and if those conditions aren’t met, you’ll... Kimberly Palmer is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: kpalmer@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @kimberlypalmer. The article 5 Things to Know About the Key Cashback Credit Card originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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5 Things to Know About the Delta Reserve for Business Credit Card

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5 Things to Know About the Delta Reserve for Business Credit Card
Small-business owners who want a new credit card and who are continually flying out of Atlanta, Boston, Cincinnati or other strongholds of Delta Air Lines might shortlist the Delta Reserve for Business Credit Card. Learn More It offers airport lounge access, progress toward elite status and other perks. The card is scheduled to get better —... Gregory Karp is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: gkarp@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @spendingsmart. The article 5 Things to Know About the Delta Reserve for Business Credit Card originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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ESL Teachers: Here’s What You Need to Know About TEFL Certifications

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ESL Teachers: Here’s What You Need to Know About TEFL Certifications
English is the language of the global business world, which means demand for English teachers is high while requirements to teach remain relatively low, especially so abroad and even more so online. In recent years, scores of online certification companies have sprouted up to train soon-to-be English teachers, offering credentials in what’s called Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) or Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). For our purposes, they’re interchangeable. “This is a very, very rapidly growing industry,” said Jessie Smith, a former English teacher in South Korea and Vietnam who now works at the International TEFL Academy. “The demand can’t really be put into words.”  Teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) online is a welcomed side gig for many. Teachers get to set their own schedules, connect with students around the world and rake in between $15 and $25 an hour teaching premade lessons.  Not bad for a part-time, entry-level position. But before you sign up — and pay — to obtain TEFL certification online, here’s what you need to know. What to Consider Before Getting a TEFL Certification Online You might be ready to start shopping for TEFL providers, but do this first: Determine your goals as an ESL teacher. “You owe it to your students to be a good teacher, to be a trained teacher,” Smith said. “You need to be prepared professionally, mentally.” Why Do You Want to Teach ESL? Do a quick pulse check. Ask yourself what you plan to accomplish as an ESL teacher. Do you want a career change? A lucrative side gig? To travel and work in other countries? Your answer will determine what type of TEFL certification you’re going to need.  For career changes, proper education is always a good idea. Colleges and universities are big providers of TEFL certifications, and some degrees even include them. If you don’t have a degree in TEFL, the University of Cambridge and Trinity College provide the most comprehensive certifications — referred to as the CELTA and the Trinity, respectively. These programs are only offered in-person. (Full disclosure: I earned a CELTA before teaching English abroad. It was the most intense program I’ve ever experienced.) But if you’re eyeing a temporary side gig, you may not want to shell out the money for an expensive, in-person certification to teach ESL online. Almost all accredited TEFL certifications will require an in-person component, usually a 20-hour teaching practicum at a local language center or school. However, as members of ESL advice forums will tell you, most online employers don’t check or require accredited certifications with in-person practicums (for now). Lastly, one of the most effective ways to earn money while traveling is by teaching English abroad. Requirements vary by country, though it’s good to have a bachelor’s degree plus an accredited TEFL certificate with a teaching practicum. Latin American and Southeast Asian countries have laxer rules and may not require a degree or a TEFL certification. FROM THE MAKE MONEY FORUM Private tutor 8/20/19 @ 1:27 PM How Can Someone Living in the Heart of Africa Make Money Online? 8/20/19 @ 1:23 PM Passive Income 8/9/19 @ 1:07 PM Extra Income 4/10/19 @ 3:01 PM B See more in Make Money or ask a money question What Does it Take to Become TEFL-Certified? The majority of programs simply require that applicants are 18 years old or older and have a high school diploma. Native English fluency isn’t required, as TEFL certifications are popular credentials for foreign English teachers as well. But a high level of English fluency is required to participate in top-tier programs (C1 or IELTS Band 7, for the ESL nerds). Programs may vary slightly, but quality programs should include at least 120 hours of coursework with 20 hours dedicated to hands-on teaching to foreign-language-speaking students. These lessons should be observed by a qualified ESL professor. CELTA and Trinity programs are graded on a pass/fail basis while some online hybrid programs may include quizzes and a passing score of 60%.  How Much Do TEFL Certifications Cost? Depending on what program you choose and what your goals are as a teacher, costs will range widely. A fully online TEFL certification can run for $9 on Groupon, but you should know that it’s unaccredited. Online ESL teachers tend to purchase Groupon programs simply for a certification code that they add to their job applications, which can boost hourly pay toward the $25 mark. But if you plan to teach in person or long-term, skip the bargain bin programs. Pro Tip Plan to teach English in person? Get a TEFL certification with an in-person practicum to boost your confidence and gain real-world teaching experience.  The “brand name” TEFL certifications, aka the CELTA and Trinity, run between $2,000 and $3,000. These programs are internationally recognized and are more suited for career ESL teachers. Most accredited TEFL programs are usually half that price: around $1,100. “A true, university-level TEFL class could not possibly run under $1,000,” Smith said. How Do You Know If a TEFL Certification Online is Legit? Online TEFL providers are everywhere. They’re quick. They’re cheap. And most of the time, they’re unaccredited. Some companies aren’t transparent in their accreditation, which means they probably aren’t legit. In some program listings, you’ll see the words “self-accredited,” Smith said. “Which — needless to say — means just about nothing.” Price is another factor. The cheaper the price, the higher the chance the program is unaccredited. That doesn’t mean, however, that expensive programs are automatically legit. Shady providers can just as easily charge more money to give an air of quality. If the program costs hundreds or thousands of dollars, confirm that it’s run by an experienced professor and that the company holds a recognized accreditation.  The most popular accrediting bodies for TEFL programs are: Accrediting Council for Continuing Education and Training (ACCET) British Council Chartered College of Teaching (formerly College of Teachers) Training Qualifications U.K. (TQUK) The World TEFL Accrediting Commission Popular accredited TEFL providers include: Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE) International TEFL Academy International Open Academy University-run TEFL programs, including the CELTA and Trinity You owe it to your students to be a good teacher, to be a trained teacher. You need to be prepared professionally. The list is by no means exhaustive. If you stumble upon a program that you’re unsure of, search the website for an accreditation seal or license number. Still unsure? Contact the accrediting body directly to confirm that the provider is legit. If you’re only shelling out $9, you may decide it’s not worth your time. But if you come across an expensive TEFL program that isn’t mentioned above, be sure to check for accreditation.    Most accrediting bodies require TEFL providers to include a practicum to receive accreditation. One notable exception is International Open Academy’s TEFL program, which is fully online. The Penny Hoarder confirmed with [...]
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6 Things to Know About United Lounges

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6 Things to Know About United Lounges
When it comes to airport lounges, there are many options for travelers. If you’re evaluating which lounge will be the best for you, here’s what you need to know about United Airline lounges. 1. United lounges are everywhere It’s not hard to find a United Airlines-associated lounge, especially if you’re flying first or business class... Amanda Johnson is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. The article 6 Things to Know About United Lounges originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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5 Things to Know About the Rakuten Cash Back Visa Card

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5 Things to Know About the Rakuten Cash Back Visa Card
Virtual window shoppers who use Rakuten.com — formerly known as the cash-back shopping website Ebates — could be earning even more cash back on their purchases with the Rakuten Cash Back Visa credit card. Image courtesy of Synchrony In 2019, Ebates rebranded as Rakuten, but the $0-annual-fee credit card’s rewards structure remained the same. The new name, which means... Melissa Lambarena is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: mlambarena@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @LissaLambarena. The article 5 Things to Know About the Rakuten Cash Back Visa Card originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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5 Things to Know About the Banc of California Los Angeles Football Club Mastercard

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5 Things to Know About the Banc of California Los Angeles Football Club Mastercard
Do you bleed black and gold for the Los Angeles Football Club? You might want to check out the Banc of California Los Angeles Football Club Mastercard®. Learn More The $0-annual-fee card, issued by Elan Financial Services, earns decent rewards, but it’s also packed with perks that any superfan would get a kick out of....The article 5 Things to Know About the Banc of California Los Angeles Football Club Mastercard originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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5 Things to Know About UBS Business Credit Cards

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5 Things to Know About UBS Business Credit Cards
UBS Bank caters to wealthy individuals, institutions and corporate clients worldwide, as well as private clients in Switzerland. So naturally, when the bank launched a trio of business credit cards in June 2019, the cards all came with princely perks and swanky benefits befitting the high-end clientele most likely to bank with UBS. Not everyone will be... Robin Saks Frankel is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: rfrankel@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @robinsaks. The article 5 Things to Know About UBS Business Credit Cards originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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4 Things to Know About Singapore Airlines Lounges

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4 Things to Know About Singapore Airlines Lounges
Airport lounge access continues to be one of the more sought-after travel perks. Travelers can escape from the bustle of the main terminal into a smaller, often quieter area that includes snacks, drinks, private bathrooms and more. Singapore Airlines offers some of the most exclusive airline operated lounges out there. Here’s how to gain access to... Curtis Sprung is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. The article 4 Things to Know About Singapore Airlines Lounges originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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5 Hidden Features of 401(k) Plans That You Should Know About

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5 Hidden Features of 401(k) Plans That You Should Know About
When it comes to 401(k) plans, you may be missing out on benefits that you don’t know about. Your 401(k) plan doesn’t have to offer all the tax-savings provisions that the IRS allows for 401(k) plans. So, not all plans have every possible 401(k) feature, which means there are features you might not realize exist. The only way to find out what options your 401(k) offers is to ask your... [...]
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Piggy Banks vs. Banking Apps: Teaching Kids About Money in the Digital Age

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Piggy Banks vs. Banking Apps: Teaching Kids About Money in the Digital Age
When you buy food with a swipe of a card and pay bills with a click of a button, what are your kids learning about money? “It is getting harder and harder to teach our kids about money and finance in the digital world because there’s just not as much opportunity to interact with money,” said Liz Frazier, a New York-based financial planner and author of the upcoming book “Beyond Piggy Banks and Lemonade Stands.” In a world of neat budgeting apps and debit cards for kids, Frazier recommends sticking with the basics — at least initially. Start kids on the three piggy bank system — one for spending, one for saving, one for sharing. Frazier uses simple clear jars so they can see their money grow. Children also learn about money by watching their parents. While swiping a debit card at the store makes sense to you, kids don’t concretely view that transaction as spending money. “As parents, we should try to expose [children] to real money whenever we can,” she said. For those who don’t regularly carry around cash, this is easier said than done. Frazier recommends starting off with smaller purchases like coffee or lunch at a restaurant. Show your kids the bill, help them count out money for payment and ask them to check if they received the correct change. When you aren’t using physical money — like when you use a debit card for groceries or a check for a school fundraiser — treat those moments as opportunities to advance the money conversation. “Start explaining the differences between what payment method you’re using — the debit card, credit card and cash — as you’re using it,” Frazier said. “They’re not going to totally understand everything in the beginning, but you just want to get them comfortable with the product.” Once you feel your child has an understanding of money basics and has had plenty of interaction with physical cash, opening a bank account for your kid can serve as a good transition to working with online tools and digital transactions. Fight the temptation to start an online account from the convenience of home. Visiting a brick-and-mortar bank or credit union is a better learning experience, Frazier said. “Go to the bank together and have the banker explain to your child that you’re opening up an account,” she said. “At this point you can get a debit card and start using it together at the store or getting out money at the ATM. You can also look at the statements every month, or every week if you want to, and walk through what money you put in [and] what you took out.” Opening a savings account is a good opportunity to introduce your kids to the concept of interest — how their money increases when they let their savings sit. Pro Tip When introducing your kids to money management apps, Frazier recommends including them in the research to find one that is established, secure and engaging. Conversations about money lessons for kids should stay positive and focus on useful information. If money stresses you out, do your best not to convey that to your children. Instead focus on the lessons you’ve learned from your financial mistakes. And don’t forget to tell your kids about your success and what goals you have. It’s Never Too Late to Provide Money Lessons for Kids Speaking of financial mistakes, Frazier said exposing your kids to money at an early age allows them to make mistakes when they’re young enough that the consequences aren’t so weighty. Maybe they spend all their money on a trendy gadget that turns out to be a dud, or they give in to an impulse purchase that sets them back from saving for something they really want. The fallback from those choices isn’t as devastating as not having any savings when an emergency pops up as an adult. FROM THE BUDGETING FORUM Budgeting as a Couple 5/10/19 @ 7:21 PM How to get better coupons 4/30/19 @ 9:41 PM Have you tried the Zero Based budgeting method? 6/7/19 @ 9:58 AM Teacher Budgeting for the Summer 5/22/19 @ 9:18 AM See more in Budgeting or ask a money question If you’ve missed out on teaching your kids about money in kindergarten and now they’re in their teenage years, it isn’t too late to start having personal finance discussions. As a financial planner, Frazier sees the negative consequences that come from people not being taught about money. The Penny Hoarder conducted a financial literacy survey in March and found that adults who didn’t grow up learning about money made less income and had less savings than those who were exposed to financial literacy growing up. Teaching your kids about money is the best gift you can give your children, Frazier said. “They are going to learn it one way or the other so you want them to learn it the right way,” she said. Key Takeaways Give your children experiences with tangible money. Include your kids in conversations about financial decisions. Open a bank account for your kids to transition them to the world of digital finance. Share your personal lessons, successes and goals with your children. Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. She already talks to her 4-year-old about money. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
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5 Things to Know about the AAdvantage Aviator Red and Silver Mastercards

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5 Things to Know about the AAdvantage Aviator Red and Silver Mastercards
The AAdvantage® Aviator® Red World Elite Mastercard® and the AAdvantage® Aviator® Silver World Elite Mastercard®, both issued by Barclays, will reward users who book a lot of travel on American Airlines. In fact, American Airlines purchases are the only way to earn double AAdvantage miles per dollar spent on the Aviator® Red — for every other purchase,... Sara Rathner is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: srathner@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @sarakrathner. The article 5 Things to Know about the AAdvantage Aviator Red and Silver Mastercards originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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