Dominique Gazel-Anthoine: “Each closing is my most successful operation”

Dominique Gazel-Anthoine: “Each closing is my most successful operation”

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Dominique Gazel-Anthoine: “Each closing is my most successful operation”
The post Dominique Gazel-Anthoine: “Each closing is my most successful operation” appeared first on ONEtoONE Corporate Finance.
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T-Rex & Triceratops Dinosaur Bump & Go Toy Cars (Set of 4) only $18.89 shipped!

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T-Rex & Triceratops Dinosaur Bump & Go Toy Cars (Set of 4) only $18.89 shipped!
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. These T-Rex & Triceratops Dinosaur Bump & Go Toy Cars (Set of 4) look like SO much fun! You can get these T-Rex & Triceratops Dinosaur Bump & Go Toy Cars (Set of 4) for just $14.99 shipped when you use the promo code PRES10 at checkout! This set includes two T-Rexes and two Triceratopses, all individually wrapped — making them the perfect Easter basket gift idea! Valid through February 17, 2020, while supplies last. [...]
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Carter’s Baby 5-Pack Bodysuits only $9.51 at Kohl’s!

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Carter’s Baby 5-Pack Bodysuits only $9.51 at Kohl’s!
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. These Carter’s Baby 5-Pack Bodysuits would make a great baby shower gift idea! You can get Carter’s Baby 5-Pack Bodysuits for only $9.51 at Kohl’s right now! Here’s how: Infant Boys or Girls Carter’s 5-Pack Bodysuits – $13.99 (regularly $28.99) Use promo code BABY20 (20% off Baby Clothing & Accessories) Use promo code ROSES (20% off $100+ purchase or 15% off) Choose free in-store pickup $9.51 after codes – just $1.90 per bodysuit! Thanks, Hip2Save! [...]
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Brigette’s $91 Grocery Shopping Trip and Weekly Menu Plan for 6

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Brigette’s $91 Grocery Shopping Trip and Weekly Menu Plan for 6
Aldi 1/2 gallon Orange Juice – $1.59 1/2 gallon Unsweetened Almond Milk – $1.65 1 gallon Whole Milk – $0.97 1 32-oz carton Half and Half – $1.55 1 box Butter Quarters – $2.58 1 box Rice Squares – $1.49 1 pkg Plain Rice Cakes – $1.45 1 32-oz carton Egg Whites – $2.95 1 jug Pancake Syrup – $1.29 1 jar Chicken Bouillon Cubes – $1.69 1 jar Beef Bouillon Cubes – $1.69 1 jar Hot Sauce – $1.53 1 jar Chili Powder – $0.79 1 jar Onion Powder – $0.79 1 4-lb bag Sugar – $1.73 2 loaves Sandwich Bread – $1.34 1 pkg Flour Tortillas – $0.95 1 10-lb bag Fresh Chicken Leg Quarters – $4.99 1 jar Green Olives – $0.79 3 cans Green Beans – $1.14 1 pkg Romaine Hearts – $2.29 1 bag Mini Sweet Peppers – $2.69 1 pkg Zucchini – $1.17 1 Cauliflower – $1.99 1 bag Lemons – $2.09 1 pkg Mini Cucumbers – $1.99 1 pkg Broccoli Crowns – $1.979 1 large tube Organic Spring Mix – $3.49 1 2-lb bag Shredded Cheddar Cheese – $4.99 1 2-lb bag Shredded Mozzarella Cheese – $4.99 1 pkg Deli Sliced Cheese – $1.33 1 tub Goat Cheese Crumbles – $2.19 1 pkg String Cheese – $1.99 1 24-oz carton Cottage Cheese – $1.55 1 16-oz pkg Deli Meat – $2.85 1 pkg Pepperoni – $2.09 1 pkg Turkey Bacon – $1.89 2 bags frozen Steamed Mixed Vegetables – $1.14 2 pkgs frozen Broccoli Florets – $1.92 1 carton Grape Tomatoes – $1.49 1 jar Salsa – $0.79 1 jar Spaghetti Sauce – $0.85 2 cans Biscuits – $1.90 3 dozen Eggs – $2.88 Total: $85.29 Harris Teeter I got all of the above for $5.88 during 3-day Double Dollar Coupons last weekend. I’m not including the coupon links as the prices are no longer valid, but I am including this in my grocery total this week. Total: $5.88 Grocery Total for the Week: $91.17 Weekly Menu Plan Breakfasts Everyone is responsible for making/cleaning up their own breakfasts. Choices include: Cereal, Toast, Fruit (we have lots of leftover fruit from the last few weeks), Cottage Cheese, Scrambled/Boiled/Fried Eggs, Veggie Omelets, Smoothies Lazy Monkey Bread  (for a brunch with friends on Saturday) Lunches Deli Meat/Cheese Sandwiches, Apples, Cucumbers x 2 Cooked Pasta with Shredded Cheese, Oranges, Carrots/Mini Peppers x 2 Leftovers x 3 Dinners Crustless Broccoli, Bacon and Cheddar Quiche, Biscuits, Applesauce Chicken Noodle Soup, Dill Bread Shredded Venison BBQ on Homemade Buns, Roasted Broccoli, Tossed Salad Crispy Baked Chicken, Tossed Salad, Roasted Cauliflower, Creamy Milk Rice Date Night Out (kids eat Grilled Cheese and Green Beans at home) Pepperoni Pizza, Mixed Vegetables, Tossed Salad Leftovers [...]
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Is Costco Membership Worth it for Gas Alone?

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Is Costco Membership Worth it for Gas Alone?
I grew up in Kansas, but have lived in San Diego for the past four years. Instinctively, I knew gas prices would be more expensive in California. No matter, I thought. My Costco membership card might just dampen the blow from gasoline costs. But I had my doubts. Is a Costco membership worth it for ... Read More about Is Costco Membership Worth it for Gas Alone? The post Is Costco Membership Worth it for Gas Alone? appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom. [...]
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Most Workers Don’t Know This Retirement Tax Credit Exists

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Most Workers Don’t Know This Retirement Tax Credit Exists
Tax season is now underway. But as in years past, millions of taxpayers are probably still missing out on the chance to slash their tax bill by as much as $4,000 simply because they overlook a little-known federal tax credit. It’s called the Retirement Savings Contributions Credit, aka the Saver’s Credit. If you’re eligible for it, this credit is worth as much as 10% to 50% [...]
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15 Cars That the Most Owners Drive for 15 Years or More

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15 Cars That the Most Owners Drive for 15 Years or More
If you are looking for a car — and hoping it will last for a decade and a half — we’ve got one bit of advice for you: Buy Japanese. That was the takeaway of iSeeCars’ latest annual ranking of cars that people keep the longest. The car search engine found that all 15 vehicles that original owners were most likely to keep for 15 years or more were from Japanese manufacturers. [...]
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Ulta: Jumbo Size Hair Care Products as low as $12.49 each (Matrix, Paul Mitchell, Redken, and more!)

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Ulta: Jumbo Size Hair Care Products as low as $12.49 each (Matrix, Paul Mitchell, Redken, and more!)
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. Wow! This is a great time to stock up on hair care products including brands like Matrix, Paul Mitchell, Redken and more! Right now, Ulta is hosting their Jumbo Shampoo & Conditioner Sale Event both in-store and online including brands like Matrix Biolage, Paul Mitchell, Redken and more! Plus, you can save $3.50 off a $15+ order when you use the promo code 713039 at checkout! And for every jumbo hair care item you purchase, you can grab a liter pump for just $1 (regularly $3) – price will automatically adjust at checkout. Limit 4 per transaction. Check out these deal ideas… Paul Mitchell Tea Tree Special Shampoo or Conditioner 33.8 oz – $19.99 (regularly $34) Use promo code 713039 ($3.50 off $15+ purchase) $16.49 after code Or you can get this for $19.99 on Amazon. Paul Mitchell Lemon Sage Thickening Shampoo or Conditioner – $19.99 (regularly $37) Use promo code 713039 ($3.50 off $15+ purchase) $16.49 after code Or you can get this for $19.99 on Amazon. Redken All Soft Shampoo 33.8oz – $19.99 (regularly $36.50) Use promo code 713039 ($3.50 off $15+ purchase) $16.49 after code Redken All Soft Conditioner 33.8oz – $15.99 (regularly $33.50) Use promo code 713039 ($3.50 off $15+ purchase) $12.49 after code Matrix Biolage Volumebloom Shampoo or Conditioner 33.8 oz – $15.99 (regularly $28) Use promo code 713039 ($3.50 off $15+ purchase) $12.49 after code Or you can get this for $15.99 on Amazon. Matrix Biolage Colorlast Shampoo or Conditioner 33.8 oz – $15.99 (regularly $30) Use promo code 713039 ($3.50 off $15+ purchase) $12.49 after code Or you can get this for $15.99 on Amazon. Bedhead Urban Antidotes Recovery Shampoo 50.7oz or Conditioner – $19.99 (regularly $33.99) Use promo code 713039 ($3.50 off $15+ purchase) $16.49 after code Choose free in-store pickup to avoid shipping costs. Thanks, Hip2Save! [...]
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Holidays for Less with Dollar General

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Holidays for Less with Dollar General
This is a sponsored post on behalf of Dollar General. All opinions are my own and were not influenced by any parties. Thanksgiving is a week away, and you know that that means — Christmas is knocking on your door!  Since Thanksgiving is so late this year, there is less time between the two holidays.  ... Read More about Holidays for Less with Dollar General The post Holidays for Less with Dollar General appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom. [...]
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Bitcoin transaction volume through merchants is the single most important metric in the Bitcoin economy

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Bitcoin transaction volume through merchants is the single most important metric in the Bitcoin economy
Editor’s Note: this is the 5th post on Daily Fintech, written in 2014 – sadly not much progress on this front in 5 years. To give our authors a break over the holidays, we are re-posting from our archive of over 1,000 articles. Rather than pick favourites we elected to simply repost the first 8 articles (as that was over 5 years ago you may have missed them; we were pretty unknown then).  As we close out 2019, make a resolution to be smarter about Fintech in 2020 by subscribing for just US$143 a year (= $0.39 per day). You will get all our fresh daily insights and participate in our forum. You can also read our archives with over 1,000 articles, an example of which you are reading from over 5 years ago. We look forward to welcoming you to the Daily Fintech membership community today!   The future of Bitcoin as an alternative currency is tied to one simple metric – merchant acceptance and the velocity of money through those merchants.   Bitcoin has potential as a) a payment network, b) a store of value that you can invest/speculate in and c) a currency. This article is only about bitcoin as a currency.   Like others before me, I have become more positive about the future of bitcoin the more that I learn about it. A few months ago I would have leaned to the view that Bitcoin the payment network had a great future but that bitcoin the currency would be a footnote in history. Today I am more positive, because the trend lines and motivations around merchant acceptance are positive.   If mainstream merchants accept bitcoin, it will thrive. If not, anybody owning bitcoin will need to first transfer bitcoin into Fiat currency and the regulatory off ramp problem will kill it as an alternative currency. Without mainstream merchant acceptance, bitcoin the currency will live on only in the shadow economy and become a footnote in history. Forget the headlines about bitcoin price fluctuations or the latest VC deal; these are “noise on the line” compared to merchant acceptance.   We have been through two phases of merchant acceptance and we may be about to start the third phase (phases overlap i.e. one does not have to end before another one begins):   Phase 1. Illegal online transactions, made famous by Silk Road. This got some media attention and confirms the old saying that, “there is no such thing as bad press”.   Phase 2. Attracting rich Bitcorati for legal products. This is the phase we are in today. The merchant logic here is very simple. If a rich person wants to pay me in some unusual currency, I am motivated to accept that currency. Enough people got rich speculating in bitcoin or mining bitcoin in the early days for this to be a real niche market. These Bitcorati are bitcoin enthusiasts, so if they see two objects they desire equally and one says “we accept bitcoin” then that rich Bitcorati will choose the merchant who accepts bitcoin. This is fundamentally different from phase 1 because a) it is legal and b) we will start to see merchant success stories akin to the merchants who were early adopters on the Internet.   The enabler for phase 2 is the elimination of the volatility problem. The same volatility that is a boon for speculators is a showstopper issue for merchants. There is no value in getting rid of those hated 2-3% Credit Card fees if the bitcoin price moves more than that before you can use it to pay your suppliers and live your life.   The two leaders in processing Bitcoin for merchants are Coinbase and Bitpay. At time of writing both claim 35,000 merchants. Both have raised a lot of money from top tier investors. Their pitch to merchants is that accepting Bitcoin is as easy as accepting a credit card – with lower fees. Coinbase’s pitch to merchants for example:   “When a sale is made, you can instantly sell the bitcoin received to Coinbase to avoid exposure to bitcoin volatility.”   A leader in merchant adoption could be the first VC backed Bitcoin success, analogous to the Netscape moment. An IPO would give the venture mainstream visibility and kick-start the next wave of Bitcoin innovation, funding and adoption. It’s a pity that the bar is so much higher for an IPO than it was 20 years ago, but that is another story.   The tipping point is simple. It comes when merchants switch from asking, “why should I bother accepting bitcoin?” to, “is there any good reason not to accept bitcoin?” When that happens and consumers see the bitcoin symbol on more merchants checkout (online or offline) they will be more interested in paying by bitcoin.   2014 has been a good year so far for merchant adoption with the following big e-commerce players announcing that they are accepting Bitcoin – Overstock, Dell, DISH, TigerDirect and Newegg. Overstock was the bridge from Phase 1 to Phase 2. Patrick Byrne, the founder CEO of Overstock is known as a critic of the establishment while running a large mainstream business.   We have to move beyond the Bitcorati to get to the tipping point. Somebody who has not got Bitcoins from mining or speculating early in the game has to be motivated to buy using bitcoin instead of a credit card. I have been talking to some small merchants to ask them what might trigger them to accept bitcoin. These are merchants who do not have an obvious Bitcorati customer base; some may do so and the merchant won’t know until they try which speaks to the “is there any good reason not to accept bitcoin?” story. Most had been totally put off Bitcoin due to the volatility issue and the story that the volatility problem has been fixed has not yet reached them.   However in their busy lives, there still has to be a good reason to take the time and trouble to accept bitcoin. One story that made these merchants think about accepting bitcoin came up a couple of times and this could become Phase 3 of bitcoin merchant adoption:   Phase 3. Micro-multinationals who want to accept international customers. Big businesses have already got doing business globally nailed. Small businesses don’t have very good solutions that are a) easy to implement b) inexpensive. Getting international payments via credit cards is easy but expensive; you pay a lot for the currency transfer back to your home currency. You could accept payment in foreign currencies but that gets complex. First, you have to decide which foreign currencies to offer and Murphy’s Law says that the one currency that you omitted is the one that your ideal customer wants to use (an American merchant may enable EUR and GBP and miss the Swiss customer who really wanted that high margin upmarket product as long as she can pay in CHF). Then you will have the hassle of getting your bank to accept multiple deposits in foreign currencies and when they do that you will find that you lose a lot when your bank converts it back to your home currency.   Doing this via bitcoin won’t be simple, but at least Bitcoin will be solving a real problem for merchants. Nobody has sized the micro-multinational market, but anecdotally it is large and tools such as VOIP now make it more natural to transact across borders, so this is likely to increase. This Phase is important because it will get more consumers (who have not mined or speculated) to use bitcoin. Lets say a consumer wants to buy something online that is priced in a foreign currency. If consumers see a simple calculator that tells them how much cheaper it is to pay via bitcoin than their credit card or debit card and it looked as easy as using their credit or debit card, consumers may give it a go. Phase 4. When Bitcoin becomes universal, just another option alongside cash and the usual Credit Cards in main street shops and e-commerce sites. To look at how could Bitcoin to cross the chasm from early adopters (Bitcorati and Micro-multinationals) to a universal payment option, we need to move into some spec [...]
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The 10 Most Read ‘Dear Penny’ Columns of 2019

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The 10 Most Read ‘Dear Penny’ Columns of 2019
In 2019, you asked Dear Penny about mooching relatives, the mysteries of credit scores and how to bounce back when you’re behind on everything. You asked about retiring early, retiring with student loans and retiring with next to nothing saved.  But by far the most commonly asked question was whether to pay off debt vs. do everything else. These are the 10 most-read Dear Penny financial advice columns in 2019. Keep the questions coming in 2020. Ask Dear Penny your tricky money dilemmas here and you could see your question answered in a future column. The 10 Most Read ‘Dear Penny’ Financial Advice Columns of 2019 Here are your top 10 questions for Dear Penny in 2019. 1. I Helped My Daughter Buy a Car and Now She Won’t Make Payments This mom made an expensive mistake when she helped her daughter buy a car: She signed for the loan, but put the car title in her daughter’s name — with the understanding that her daughter would take over payments. Three years later, her daughter still refuses to pay up, so she reached out to Penny for solutions. 2. My Family Keeps Asking Me for Money and It’s Bleeding Me Dry Many of us would be willing to help out our families in their times of need. But what happens when your family keeps asking for more and more? That’s the situation this letter writer found himself in, so he reached out to Penny for help.  3. We’re in a Deep Financial Hole. Is There Any Way Out? The letter writer reached out to Dear Penny in a state of crisis: mounting bills she couldn’t pay, three small kids to care for, a car with shot brakes. “I’m really at a loss, and I’m having horrible anxiety over it. I don’t know what to do,” the letter writer wrote.  4. I Paid Off My Car Early. Why Did My Score Fall 79 Points? This letter writer made a savvy money move in paying off their car loan early — which is why they were so baffled when their credit score dropped. Read Penny’s explanation for why that might have happened. 5. I’m 54 With No Retirement Savings. How Do I Get Started? This letter writer greeted their 54th birthday with a crushing realization — that they were quickly approaching retirement age but had no retirement savings. Here’s what Penny suggests the reader do ASAP to get themselves on the path to retirement. 6. My Fiance Was Laid Off. He’s Fine With Letting Me Pay the Bills Forever When the letter writer’s fiance lost his job, they had to find a way to make ends meet using only her salary. Six months later, she’s tired of being the sole breadwinner, but her fiance accuses her of nagging whenever she asks him when he’s going to find a job. Read Penny’s advice for how the letter writer can productively deal with this difficult situation. 7. We Have Bad Credit. Is There Any Hope for a Debt Consolidation Loan? This letter writer hoped a debt consolidation loan would help them begin the hard work of rebuilding their credit, but their credit is so poor they keep getting turned down. How can they get themselves out of this Catch-22? Penny has some ideas. 8. Should I Invest My $10K Savings or Use It to Pay Off Debt? The letter writer has managed to save up $10,000 and now he wants to know: What should he do with it? Should he pay off debt? Invest? Here’s why Penny says he shouldn’t do either.  9. I’m a Single Mom Making $60K a Year. How Can I Retire at 45? This letter writer is 32 with a pretty ambitious goal: to retire in 13 years. While caring for two small children. And making $60,000 a year. Can she do it? Penny explains why this might not be realistic — and she also has some words about the FIRE (financial independence, retire early) movement. 10. A Heart Attack Put Me in Debt and Now I Can’t Get Out This letter writer is one of the millions of Americans who landed deeply in debt due to unexpected medical expenses, and she’s tried just about everything she could think of to get herself back out. “I’m too embarrassed to tell my family or my friends, and I definitely don’t want to ask them for more money,” she writes. Penny offers the letter writer some advice — and some compassion.   Robin Hartill is a senior editor at The Penny Hoarder and the voice behind Dear Penny. Send your tricky money questions to DearPenny@thepennyhoarder.com. Deputy managing editor Caitlin Constantine contributed to this article. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
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Seventh Generation Free & Clear Dish Liquid Soap for just $1.94 each, shipped!

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Seventh Generation Free & Clear Dish Liquid Soap for just $1.94 each, shipped!
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. Stock up on dish soap with this Seventh Generation deal! Amazon has this Seventh Generation Free & Clear Dish Liquid Soap 6-Pack for just $11.65 shipped when you clip the 20% off e-coupon and check out through Subscribe & Save. That’s like paying just $1.94 per bottle, shipped! This is such a great stock-up deal for this brand. Note: Once your order ships, you can go into your Amazon account and cancel your subscription if you don’t want recurring orders. Thanks, Hip2Save! [...]
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Most Valuable Perks of the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Credit Card

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Most Valuable Perks of the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Credit Card
There are a few key perks that can make having a Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® credit card worth it.. Access to the Companion Fare When you have an Alaska Airlines Visa Signature® credit card, the Companion Fare is definitely one of your most valuable benefits. With a Companion Fare, you can get a significant discount... Reyna Gobel is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. The article Most Valuable Perks of the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Credit Card originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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The Most Valuable Perks of the Bank of America Premium Rewards Card

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The Most Valuable Perks of the Bank of America Premium Rewards Card
The Bank of America® Premium Rewards® Visa® credit card stands out from other Bank of America® cards in that it comes with a $95 annual fee — which isn’t necessarily the best reason to stand out. But don’t let the fee automatically turn you off. The card also has a slew of perks and benefits that may... Chris O'Shea is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. The article The Most Valuable Perks of the Bank of America Premium Rewards Card originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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Making the Most of the Uber Visa Credit Card

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Making the Most of the Uber Visa Credit Card
For serious foodies, the Uber Visa Card packs plenty of features, minus the surge pricing: The card’s annual fee is $0. To get the best performance possible from the card, here’s what to keep in mind. » MORE: Full review of the Uber Visa Card Scoop up the sign-up bonus Learn More The Uber Visa Card features the following welcome offer... Robin Saks Frankel is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: rfrankel@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @robinsaks. The article Making the Most of the Uber Visa Credit Card originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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Checking vs. Savings Account: Here’s Exactly When to Use Each One

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Checking vs. Savings Account: Here’s Exactly When to Use Each One
When it comes to our finances, it can feel like our list of decisions is never-ending. Should I start saving for retirement now? How should I file my taxes this year? Do I need homeowners and flood insurance? To make any decision about money, it helps to have all the pertinent information. When deciding whether to open a checking or savings account, you should start by knowing how they differ. Checking vs. Savings Account: What Are the Differences? Here are the major differences between a checking vs. savings account to consider before depositing your money. How They’re Designed to Be Used A checking account is designed to store the money you plan to spend, while a savings account is meant to hold your money for a relatively long time. Checking Accounts Use the money in this account for small and/or everyday purchases, such as buying groceries, going to the movies and filling up your gas tank. Savings Accounts Ideally, you don’t spend this money in the short term. You’d use it to build an emergency fund for, say, unexpected house repairs, or save for something big, like a car, wedding, house or college. You don’t invest through a savings account, nor do you save for retirement here. You’ll want to open a separate retirement account to save for the future and invest. How to Access Your Money It’s typically easier to access your money through a checking account than it is through a savings account.  Checking Accounts You can spend or withdraw money in your checking account by: Using a debit card: Paying with a debit card is the same as paying with cash; the money is withdrawn directly from your checking account.  Writing a check: Although paying with paper checks is becoming less common, you can often make payments from your checking account with a check, too.  Withdrawing cash from an ATM.  Savings Accounts Accessing money in your savings is a bit more difficult than acquiring cash from your checking account. You can: Transfer money from your savings account to your checking account online: Even if your checking and savings accounts are at different banks or credit unions, it’s still possible to transfer money from one institution to another. Withdraw from your savings account at an ATM: Using your debit card, you can withdraw money from your savings account at an ATM if your accounts are at the same bank or credit union. Just select “savings” instead of “checking” when the ATM prompts you to choose which account to withdraw from. Withdrawal Limits Unlike checking accounts, savings accounts have limits on the number of withdrawals you can make. Checking Accounts Checking accounts don’t have limits on how often you can withdraw money. You should be able to do so as many times as you want per month, provided you don’t overdraw your account.  However, many accounts do have restrictions on how much you can withdraw from an ATM or spend with your debit card in a single day. These limits vary by banking institution and can range from a few hundred to several thousand dollars. Savings Accounts Federal law says you can only withdraw money six times per month from your savings account. However, this rule only applies to certain transactions, such as transferring money from your savings to your checking account and sending wire transfers to someone else. When you’re withdrawing money from your savings account at an ATM or your bank, the limit does not apply. Fees and Deposit Requirements Fees and minimum deposits for both checking and savings accounts vary by institution.   Checking Accounts Some institutions have a minimum deposit to open a checking account, usually ranging from $25 to $100. It is possible to find a bank that doesn’t have a minimum to open an account, though. Some banks and credit unions also charge monthly maintenance fees for checking accounts. However, if you also open a savings account with the same bank and/or maintain a minimum balance, many will let that monthly fee slide. There are a few other fees associated with a checking account. Depending on your circumstances, you may have to pay: Overdraft penalties.  Card replacement fines. Incoming/outgoing wire transfer fees. Out-of-network ATM fees if you withdraw cash from an ATM that isn’t operated by your bank. Savings Accounts Many banks have a minimum to open a savings account. They also sometimes charge a monthly fee, but as with a checking account, they might waive it if you meet certain criteria, such as maintaining a minimum balance and/or having another account with the bank. Remember the aforementioned limit of six withdrawals per month for saving accounts? Well, if you exceed that, you’re charged a fee. It’s usually under $15, but if this becomes a regular occurence, a bank may convert your savings account to a checking account. FROM THE BANKING FORUM Aspiration 4/30/19 @ 9:08 AM Best bank to use? 7/12/19 @ 10:52 AM Women's Month 3/11/19 @ 9:34 AM Home Equity Loans / Lines of Credit 7/3/19 @ 12:12 PM e See more in Banking or ask a money question Interest Savings accounts usually pay slightly higher interest rates compared with checking accounts. Checking Accounts Checking account interest rates are notoriously low, with a national average of 0.06% as of Aug. 12, 2019, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. (FDIC). To clarify, that means you’d earn 6 cents per year on a $100 balance.  There are accounts that offer interest rates that are higher than the national average known as high-yield checking accounts. Usually, though, those interest rates are still minimal, so to find an account that offers higher interest rates, most people focus on savings accounts. Savings Accounts Savings accounts are known for having higher interest rates than checking accounts, but they still aren’t much: The national average is 0.09% as of Aug. 12, 2019, or a mere 9 cents per $100.  Because you theoretically leave money in a savings account for a long time, that money could build a decent amount of interest if you strategically choose a high-yield savings account.   Checking Accounts Savings Accounts Designed For Spending Saving for emergency funds or financial goals Accessibility Debit card Checks ATM Withdraw money at the bank Transfer funds to a checking account ATM Withdraw money at the bank Withdrawal Limits None Six times per month Fees Fee to open account (sometimes) Monthly maintenance fee (sometimes) Overdraft fee Card replacement fee Wire transfer fee Out-of-network ATM fee *some fees may be waived Fee to open account (sometimes) Monthly maintenance fee (sometimes) Withdrawal limit fee Out-of-network ATM fee *some fees may be waived Interest Minimal to non-existent; rates vary Higher than checking; rates vary Checking vs. Savings Account: Which Should You Open? Ideally, you would have both a checking and a savings account. In your checking account, you’d keep money for small or everyday purchases, while in your savings account, you’d store money for emergencies and short- or long-term goals. It’s worth considering whether you should open both accounts with the same bank or credit union. There are a few pros to keeping them at the same institution. For example, some places wi [...]
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14 Service Providers Most Likely to Lower Your Bill If You Ask

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14 Service Providers Most Likely to Lower Your Bill If You Ask
Feeling sticker shock every time a phone, cable or internet bill arrives? Depending on which company provides the service, lower rates may be just a phone call away. LendEDU recently analyzed data from Truebill, a personal finance tracker, budget planner and bill reminder app that helps people manage their subscriptions, to determine which service providers are most likely to drop their prices if... [...]
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Making the Most of the Capital One Savor or SavorOne

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Making the Most of the Capital One Savor or SavorOne
The Capital One® Savor® Cash Rewards Credit Card and Capital One® SavorOne℠ Cash Rewards Credit Card are about food and fun. You earn accelerated rewards on dining in or dining out, and it’s probably your go-to card when paying for entertainment. If you already spend a lot in those areas, you’ll earn rewards pretty effortlessly. But using... Gregory Karp is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: gkarp@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @spendingsmart. The article Making the Most of the Capital One Savor or SavorOne originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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The 14 Most Dangerous Cars on the Road

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The 14 Most Dangerous Cars on the Road
If you own a Mitsubishi Mirage, you might want to be extra careful the next time you back out of your driveway and take to the road. The Mirage is the most dangerous car to drive in the U.S., according to a recent study by automotive research firm and car search engine iSeeCars.com. The Chevrolet Corvette and the Honda Fit round out the top three cars with the most frequent occupant fatalities. [...]
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10 Tips for Having a Successful Garage Sale

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10 Tips for Having a Successful Garage Sale
Planning to have a garage sale soon? I’ve had a number of successful garage sales over the years and these are my top 10 garage sale tips! {Looking for other creative ways to make some extra cash? Check out our big list of income-earning ideas and our favorite legitimate paid online surveys!} Since I’m a minimalist at heart, I’ve always loved to declutter, go through old stuff, and purge what we no longer need. Back in our law school days, I frequently had garage sales to earn a little bit of extra cash — because every little bit helped stretch our really tight budget during those financially lean years! Since I’ve had SO many garage sales over the years, I’ve learned a lot about how to have a successful garage sale. If you’ve been thinking about have a garage sale soon, here are my top 10 garage sale tips! 1. Collect clutter year-round. Always have an ongoing Garage Sale stash you’re adding to. Try to regularly declutter and purge what you don’t need. When you come across something you no longer need or use, stick it in a box! Once that box fills up, start another box! And another. Without much effort at all, by the time your garage sale comes along, you’ll have multiple boxes of stuff you can sell! I used to do this throughout the year and then have an annual garage sale each year. It made things super easy, because I already had everything in one place to sell. I didn’t have to spend days going through items and figuring out what to sell. 2. Have a plan. A successful garage sale does not happen without organization. At least a week before your garage sale, I recommend going through your home top to bottom and clearing out any last-minute clutter that’s not already in the garage sale boxes. At least 2-3 days before the sale, set aside an afternoon to price everything out and organize your items. And then the day before the sale, devote a few hours to final organization — advertising on Facebook Marketplace or Craigslist, getting some cash together for change, making signs, etc. Do not wait until the last minute to pull off a garage sale. Either it will flop or you’ll run yourself ragged — or both. If you’re in a new location or you’re new to hosting a garage sale, I’d suggest that you start getting organized at least 3-4 weeks in advance. Getting organized for a successful garage sale: :: How are you going to display items? Do you need to borrow or make a clothes-rack? :: Do you have enough table space? If not, check and see if you can borrow tables from friends or put together some makeshift tables out of plywood and boxes. :: What signs will you be using and how many do you need? Where will you be displaying the signs to best direct traffic to your home? Drive the routes people will be using to find your home and decide on locations for your signs ahead of time. :: Who is going to put the signs out the morning of the sale? Designate someone for this ahead of time and let them know specifically where to place the signs. :: How much cash should you have on hand and how will you keep it in a safe location? :: Do you need to purchase a license for running a garage sale in your area? :: Do you have enough help? 3. Team up. One of my top garage sale tips is that you should never do them alone! Find friends or family to team up with. Not only does this arrangement mean you have a larger quantity and variety of items to sell, but it also means you have more help. Divvying up the responsibilities between 3 or 4 people makes a garage sale much more manageable. Plus, it just makes it more fun when you’re doing it with friends and family! 4. Location, location, location! If you want to have a garage sale that flops, pick a location that is off-the-beaten-path and hard to get to. That’s a surefire way to lose a lot of business. Don’t live near a busy intersection? Look for alternative locations like the home of a friend or relative. We always had really successful garage sales at our home in Kansas, because we lived right between two very heavily-trafficked streets. We put up some good signage and the crowds came! 5. Timing is everything (well, just about!). I don’t advise planning a sale in the freezing cold Winter or the blazing hot Summer. Choose a time of the year when the weather will be very pleasant and try to check the weather forecast ahead of time to make sure rain is not expected when you’re planning your sale. In addition, find out what days of the week are best for yard sales to run in your area. Fridays and Saturdays are usually really popular, but you’d be surprised to find that in some areas Thursdays are big days for garage sales! 6. Clearly mark your prices. It’s easy to want to just stick a big sign on a table saying that everything on that table is a quarter, but in the long-run it is much more efficient to go ahead and put price stickers on everything. Instead of having to make up prices on the spot, people will know exactly how much something is. In addition, some people are too shy to ask the price of an item, so you’ll lose a sale if an item isn’t marked. I’ve found it’s worth paying the few dollars it costs to buy pre-priced stickers for most items. It makes things SO simple and fast! I also recommend having a variety in pricing — with plenty of really inexpensive items. Often, when you have a lot of inexpensive items, people are more likely to pick up more items — and it will often help sell some of your larger-ticketed items in the long run! {Tip: If you are running a garage sale with multiple families, just put initials on all the price tags so that you can keep a tally sheet of who sold what. And you can even have two people working the money table — one to keep track of the tally sheet and one to handle all of the money transactions.} 7. Price things to sell. Of all my garage sale tips, this is one of the most important — and something that I have seen people miss the mark on time and time again with garage sales! When people come to a garage sale, they are expecting to pay garage sale prices. Keep this in mind when you price your items. While pricing can vary a bit depending on the area you live in, it’s really important to price things to sell. A good rule of thumb is to price things at what you feel would be a good bargain if you were buying that item at someone else’s garage sale. And it’s better to price something on the low end and have someone actually buy my item, than to have 25 people pick up the item and put it back down on the table because it is too expensive. 8. Advertise well. The marketing of your sale is usually the number one factor in how well your sale does. You can have great items, great prices, and a great location — but if people don’t know how to get to your house or can’t find it on their own, you won’t have a successful garage sale! So put some time and effort into making a number of quality, clearly-readable signs, and put them in conspicuous places that easily lead to your home. The brighter, bolder, and bigger the sign, the better! And don’t forget to advertise on Facebook Marketplace or Craigslist! Both are free to advertise, so why not?! And remember — the more details you can put in your ad, the better. Mention specific items, brands, and sizes. Often times people are searching for really specific items on Craigslist or Marketplace, so even if they’re not looking at garage sales, they might see one of your listed items pull up in their search! The more descriptive you can be in the listing and title, the better. And be sure to use proper grammar and spelling, too. Sometimes it’s the little things that make a big difference! 9. Mark items down on the last day. Things are usually pretty picked over by the last day of the sale. That&# [...]
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