Happy Thanksgiving + Don’t Miss Any Black Friday Deals!

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Happy Thanksgiving + Don’t Miss Any Black Friday Deals!
Black Friday is almost here! As we’ve done the past few years, our team will be taking Thanksgiving Day off to spend with our families. But we’ll be back bright and early on Friday morning to live-blog the BEST online Black Friday deals all day long! We’d love for you to come join us here. We’ll start blogging deals around 6 a.m. CT and will keep blogging as long as we keep finding deals! You can follow along here on the blog or on our Facebook Page. I’m planning on doing several Facebook Lives throughout the day so we can hang out and talk about the best deals, too. Join us from the comfort of your couch with your PJ’s on and your favorite hot beverage in hand! It’s going to be fun — and I hope you’re able to find some great deals on items you were planning to buy! Make sure you don’t miss any deals! If you want to make sure you don’t miss any of the HOTTEST time-sensitive deals throughout the day, be sure to sign up for our HOT deals newsletter! You’ll receive a few emails throughout the day with a round-up of the BEST Black Friday Deals before they have a chance to expire. And be sure to also join our Facebook group if you haven’t done so yet! We’ll post every deal in that group as soon as it goes live, and you’ll get notifications via Facebook all day long! (This is especially helpful if you’ve been missing our posts in your regular Facebook newsfeed.) Looking for Black Friday deals that are already live? Black Friday Deals have been rolling out really early this year! We’ve already posted hundreds of early Black Friday deals! Go here to see all of the latest Black Friday Deals we’ve posted. And you can also check out all of the in-store Black Friday Ad Scans here. Happy Thanksgiving! Have a WONDERFUL Thanksgiving (if you’re struggling this Thanksgiving, be sure to read this) and we’ll see you back here on MoneySavingMom.com bright and early for all the Black Friday goodness! [...]
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HUGE Savings on Muck Boots = Boots as low as $39.99!

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HUGE Savings on Muck Boots = Boots as low as $39.99!
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. Love Muck boots? You can score up to 60% off right now! Right now, Zulily is having a huge sale on Muck Boots where you can score up to 60% off boots for the family! Check out these deals… Get these Kid’s Brown & Pink Rugged II Boots for only $39.99! Get these Women’s RealTree Camo Arctic Hunter Mid-Rise Boots for only $69.99! Get these Men’s Brown MK Woody Sport Country Boots for just $99.99! Get these Men’s Brown Muckster II Ankle Rain Boots for just $64.99! Shop the Muck boot sale here. Psst!! You may be able to score free shipping when you use the promo code JUST4YOU22 at checkout but please note that this code is not working for everyone. [...]
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This week in Fintech

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This week in Fintech
Daily Fintech brings fresh daily fintech insights from people just like you – senior executives, entrepreneurs & investors working in the fintech revolution. Our weekly summaries give you a look at what you will get by reading the whole article. Bernard Lunn is a Fintech deal-maker, investor, entrepreneur and advisor. He is CEO of Daily […] The post This week in Fintech appeared first on Daily Fintech. [...]
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Fall in Love With Your Car Again Without Breaking the Bank

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Fall in Love With Your Car Again Without Breaking the Bank
We used to have a joke in our family. I’d wash the family beater, gas it up, and then say to my kids, “See how much better it runs now?” Then, based on their skeptical faces, I’d add, “It’s scientifically proven.” Your perception of your car, how it looks and how it drives, might be more... Philip Reed is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: preed@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @AutoReed. The article Fall in Love With Your Car Again Without Breaking the Bank originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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Reduce the Pain at the Pump With These 20 Ways to Save Money on Gas

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Reduce the Pain at the Pump With These 20 Ways to Save Money on Gas
Filling up the gas tank can be a thoroughly miserable experience as you watch the counter flip past $40, then $50, and keep on going.  But you can save money on gas based on where you fill up, how you pay, when you visit the gas station, how you drive and even the condition of your car. We’ve compiled 20 smart tips to help you spend less on fuel. You could save hundreds of dollars over the course of a year. How to Save Money on Gas at the Pump The biggest savings will be evident in the price you pay at the gas station. So it’s worth shopping around and employing a bit of strategy before filling up. 1. Use Apps to Find the Cheapest Gas You don’t want to buy gas at one place and then come across a station with cheaper fuel just down the street. Several websites and apps tell you the price of gasoline at the stations in your area. GasBuddy and Waze are two popular options.  Look for the cheapest gas stations along any of the routes you normally drive for work or shopping. Don’t wait until your tank is near empty and be forced to buy gas wherever is closest.  The price of gas can vary significantly across state lines, so if you’re planning a trip, check where prices are lower throughout your route. Avoid getting gas at stations just off a highway exit or in the middle of a major city — stations in those locations tend to charge more than ones a little more out of the way. 2. Skip the Premium Option Higher-octane gas isn’t necessary or beneficial in most cars, so you’re just spending more money when you buy premium. Premium gas can cost about 20 to 40 cents per gallon more than regular-grade fuel. Use regular-grade gasoline unless your car’s manufacturer specifically requires premium. 3. Join a Fuel Rewards Program Many gas station chains and grocery stores across the country offer fuel rewards programs to try to turn you into a loyal customer. Each gas station fuel rewards program and grocery store fuel rewards program has its own set of rules on how much you can save and what you have to spend in order to get the rewards, so read up on the details.  GasBuddy also offers its own fuel savings program called Pay with GasBuddy. Join for free, and you’ll  save 10 cents per gallon on your initial fill-up and 5 cents per gallon on every subsequent fill-up. You can also sign up for paid versions (Pay with GasBuddy Plus is $4.99 a month and Pay with GasBuddy Premium is $6.99 a month) to save 20 cents per gallon. (Note: Exxon Mobil, BJs, Costco, Sam’s Club, H-E-B, select Walmart stations, select Arco stations and some small, local gas stations don’t accept the Pay with GasBuddy card.) 4. Use a Rewards Credit Card When you fuel up, choose a credit card that pays you cash back or one that allows you to earn rewards points when you purchase gas. Just be sure you know what you’re getting into before opening a rewards credit card. Pay the fuel charges off in full each month so you’re not paying interest on your gas purchases. 5. Use Cash Instead of a Card Some gas stations charge a lower price per gallon if you pay with cash rather than a card. It’s their way of avoiding card processing fees. While some stations will let you pay the cash price if you use a debit card, others won’t. Check with the gas station before you swipe your card, or simply use cash when it’s time to fill up. 6. Use Free or Discounted Gift Cards You can earn gift cards or cash from survey sites like Swagbucks or Survey Junkie. You can also purchase discounted gift cards from sites like Raise or Gift Card Granny. 7. Fill Up Early in the Week According to a 2018 GasBuddy gas price analysis, gas prices tend to be the lowest on Mondays. Sundays and Tuesdays are also good days to buy cheap gas. Avoid filling your tank on Thursdays or Fridays when gas prices tend to be the most expensive. How to Save Money on Gas With Better Driving Habits How frequently you drive and how you operate your vehicle both play a role in how much you spend on gas.  8. Share Rides If you live near your co-workers and have similar schedules, take turns driving so you can all drive less each week. Organize a carpool with neighbors or friends to transport your children to school or extracurricular activities, and swap driving duties among the parents. Less time on the road means less gas used and more money saved. 9. Plan Routes Plan your shopping trips and other outings in efficient ways to reduce your drive time. If the grocery store is near your job, do your shopping after work rather than waiting until the weekend. Do your errands all in one day rather than making several trips on different days. Cutting a few miles several times weekly can add up to hundreds of miles saved annually. That could save a fill-up or two. 10. Reduce Your Idle Time Don’t start the car and then leave it running for a long time while you wait for everyone to get in or to fiddle with your navigation. Make sure you’re ready to go before starting your engine. Idling just wastes gas and causes more air pollution. FROM THE SAVE MONEY FORUM Do You Ever Pick up A Stray Penny? 2/7/19 @ 5:27 PM Do drive-in movie theaters save you money? 7/1/19 @ 7:38 PM What to buy (and not buy) from Fourth of July Sales 2019 6/27/19 @ 1:00 PM M Airfare 6/24/19 @ 5:19 PM See more in Save Money or ask a money question 11. Accelerate Slowly and Coast More Be gradual when you’re speeding up or slowing down. Generally, the faster you accelerate, the more gas you use. Be gentle on that pedal when getting up to highway speed. You’ll also get better mileage by coasting more, so plan ahead for stops and turns. Take your foot off the gas a bit sooner, and slowly glide to a stop. This actually works. 12. Use Cruise Control — Sometimes When it’s hilly you might get better mileage without cruise control, because the system will tend to downshift too much and waste gas. But otherwise, cruise! Staying at a steady speed with cruise control has been shown to save on fuel usage — plus you can make sure you don’t go over the speed limit. 13. Reduce the Use of Your Heater and Air Conditioning Blasting the heat in the winter or the A/C in the summer has an effect on your fuel economy, so keep that in mind. There’s a long-running but still inconclusive debate about whether using air conditioning or rolling down the windows contributes more to increased fuel consumption, since wind resistance from open windows creates drag on your vehicle.  When driving low speeds you may want to cool down by lowering your car windows, but if you’re driving on the highway (or even driving above 30 miles per hour), you might be better off with the air conditioner on and the windows up. 14. Slow Down Following the speed limit or driving just under it can pay off in more ways than you might think. The faster you drive, the more wind resistance you face, which reduces your fuel economy.  How Your Car Affects How Much You Spend on Gas The condition of your car makes a difference in gas consumption. Learn how to keep your ride in money-saving shape. 15. Check Tire Pressure Having underinflated tires can lower your gas mileage and cause you to lose about 2 cents per gallon, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. To find the proper tire [...]
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Shopping Around for a Mortgage Could Make You $30K Richer

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Shopping Around for a Mortgage Could Make You $30K Richer
When you purchase a home, the wheeling and dealing typically begins when you put an offer in. But home buyers who think the only opportunity to save big comes during those negotiations may miss a relatively effortless way to pay significantly less. Comparing lenders is something just 50% of home buyers do, according to our... Elizabeth Renter is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: elizabeth@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @elizabethrenter. The article Shopping Around for a Mortgage Could Make You $30K Richer originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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What to Buy (and Skip) in June

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What to Buy (and Skip) in June
In June, you may have to buy gifts for Father’s Day, graduations and weddings — or at least one or two of those occasions. After all that shopping for dads, grads and newlyweds, get a deal on something for yourself, because June will deliver plenty of savings. From scooping up swimwear to saving money on...The article What to Buy (and Skip) in June originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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11 Budgeting Tips for Recent College Grads to Master Adulting

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11 Budgeting Tips for Recent College Grads to Master Adulting
College graduation marks the beginning of what adulting truly looks like. Bye bye, student discounts. Hello, full-priced everything. You had guidance from professors, support from your parents and the camaraderie of your fellow students in school. Now you’re on your own, and it may feel overwhelming to navigate post-grad life — especially when it comes to managing your finances. Don’t stress. We’ve got you. Time to throw out that old college budget and start anew. (You did budget in college, right?) The Penny Hoarder Academy’s Budgeting 101 course is a great stop to learn the nuts and bolts of creating a budget, but here’s the practical advice we wish someone had shared with us when we were fresh out of school. 1. Don’t Succumb to Lifestyle Inflation Hopefully you’re earning more money than you did in school. Congrats! But use that salary increase for good, not for financial destruction. Don’t give into the desire to buy all the things just because you’re making more money. Chances are you’ll also have more bills. And now’s a perfect time to get in the habit of saving money for the future (but we’ll get more into that later). As you settle into your life post-college, give yourself time to adjust. Don’t go out and purchase an apartment’s worth of new furniture all at once. The key is to live within your means — or even below your means in order to build a nice cushion of savings. It might take time to figure out what that looks like. If you fail one budgeting method, give another a try. This isn’t a graded exam. 2. Bill Due Dates Are the New Assignment Deadlines Gone are the days where you’d use loans or scholarship money to pay four months of room and board in full at the beginning of each semester. Now you’ve got multiple bills in one month, each to a different service provider. Keeping track of when each bill is due is vital. Automating the process — either by using your bank’s auto-pay service or opting into auto-pay with your utility company or cell phone provider  — can be very helpful. If you want to be more conscious of what’s going out of your checking account, set up calendar alerts to remind you of each bill’s due date and make the payment manually. Pro Tip Set up one calendar alert a couple days before the due date for advanced warning and another alert the day the bill is due as a backup reminder in case you forgot to pay. Make sure to factor in when you get paid. If your employer pays you weekly, biweekly or semi-monthly, a budget based on how you’ll manage your cash flow from each paycheck may be more useful than a monthly budget. 3. Get Used to Making Student Loan Payments If you borrowed money for college, it’s time to pay up. Your loan provider will likely give you a six-month grace period before you have to start paying back your student loans. This gives you time to plan how you’ll tackle the repayment, but if you want to start paying your student loans back immediately, that’s even better. When you’re setting up your post-grad budget, make sure you’re factoring your student loan payment as a necessary expense. Check with your loan provider to see how much your minimum payments will be. If the amount seems unmanageable, you might be able to get on an income-based repayment plan. You might also consider refinancing your loans under a lower interest rate. Check to see if you’re eligible. Pro Tip You could get your loans paid off if your job has a student loan repayment program as an employee benefit or through the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program if you work in the public sector. If you have trouble finding a job or otherwise fall into hardship, a loan deferment or forbearance will temporarily pause repaying your student loan. But interest on the loan still might accrue during that period and you’d be left with more to pay back. You should only choose this option as a last resort. 4. Use Credit Cards Responsibly Credit cards can be tricky. On one hand, they can help you build a positive credit score or earn rewards points. But use them irresponsibly and you can wind up in a hole of debt. A wise practice is to charge only what you know you can afford and pay your balance in full each month. You may want to start off with a secured credit card where you put down a deposit that serves as your line of credit. If you are paying off credit card debt, keep in mind those minimum payment amounts are not your friend. They’re the lowest you have to pay each month if you don’t want creditors hounding you, but they won’t get you out of the hole any time soon. Paying extra toward your debt, even if it’s just $20 more, can significantly reduce how much you’ll pay in interest. If you actually read through your credit card statements, you should see a “minimum payment warning” section that explains how making only the minimum payment will raise your total debt and prolong the time it takes to pay it off. To give a personal example, if I pay just $39 more than the minimum payment for my credit card, I could pay off my balance in three years rather than 19 and would save over $6,000 in the process. This premise of paying more than the minimum is true for paying off student loans, car loans or even your mortgage. 5. Have a Plan If You’re Moving Back Home In this day and age, there really isn’t any shame in moving back home after college. What you’ll regret, however, is moving back home without a plan. If you revert back to your high school days when Mom and Dad shouldered all the financial responsibility of day-to-day life, you could be setting yourself up for a more challenging transition when you do finally leave the nest. Discuss with your parents the expectations for covering household bills and expenses. If they insist on you not paying any rent, put aside what you would have paid to save up for your own place or build your emergency fund. Speaking of which … 6. You Need to Have an Emergency Fund No one likes to prepare for the worst, but having money saved up in the event of an emergency is a crucial part of being financially secure. Experts say you should have between three to six months of expenses saved in an emergency fund. But even just $1,000 could be a lifesaver if your car breaks down or you need to fly out of town to attend a funeral. You could automate your savings by directing a percentage of your paycheck to a savings account. Or you could use an app like Digit to save money without thinking. Digit’s algorithm analyzes your income and spending and determines safe amounts to transfer automatically to savings. Even if you just stash $5 bills in a jar, start saving for emergencies now. 7. Create Sinking Funds to Save Up for the Big Stuff A sinking fund is a pool of money you regularly add to over time to make a large expense more manageable. Don’t just limit saving to your emergency fund. When you’re ready to upgrade to a new laptop or you’re hit with your annual car insurance bill, you’re going to wish you had saved up for them gradually. Setting up sinking funds for those infrequent expenses will prevent you from scrambling. You may want to open separate savings accounts for your different short-term savings goals. If you’re saving all your money in one account, record how much you’re contributing and what the running balance is for each goal. 8. Save for Retirement Now I know you’re just beginning your career. Retirement is probably one of the last things on your mind. But the earlier you start saving for retirement, the better off you’ll be. A 22-year-old who saves $200 a month at a growth rate of 6% will have $371,428.72 by age 62. In comparison, someone who starts making those same retirement contributions at age 32 would have only $189,739.65 by age 62. That 32-year-old would have to be saving nearly $400 a month to have over $370,000 by age 62. That’s a significant difference. Start now. Opt [...]
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