This Week’s $70 Grocery Budget + What We Ate For Dinner

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This Week’s $70 Grocery Budget + What We Ate For Dinner
Want to see what we bought for this week’s $70 grocery budget? I’m currently challenging myself to stick with a $70 budget for our family of five. This includes almost all of our breakfasts, lunches, snacks, and dinners + most household products (toiletries, laundry soap, etc.). For live updates, be sure to follow my Instagram Stories. See all posts on my $70 Grocery Budget here. I was excited about the deals we found this week and we ate some really yummy food! Kroger Shopping Trip #1 2 bags of avocados — marked down to $0.99 each 3 bags of potatoes — marked down to $0.99 each 1 bag peppers — marked down to $0.99 Milk — $2.99 1 container cottage cheese — $2 2 heads lettuce — $1.79 each 1 bag of apples — marked down to $0.99 Total with tax: $17.05 Some of the apples in the markdown bag above were Granny Smith, which none of us are fond of eating raw. So I made Cinnamon Apples in the Instant Pot with them. These were a HUGE hit with the kids and they ate them up in just a few minutes. Next time, I definitely need to double the recipe! I was so excited about a few of the Weekend Deals at Kroger — especially the cheese deal! Kroger Shopping Trip #2: La Croix — $1.99 per 8-pack with Friday-Sunday deals Classico Pasta Sauce — $0.99 each with Friday-Sunday deals 5 Simple Truth Greek yogurts — marked down to $0.49 each 2 bags of Quaker Rice Snacks — $0.99 when you buy 10 participating items 3 boxes Swiss Miss — $0.99 when you buy 10 participating items 5 bags/packages Kroger cheese — $1.29 with Friday-Sunday deals 2 containers cottage cheese — $1.49 each when you buy 10 participating items Coconut sugar — marked down to $0.99 3 boxes pasta — $0.49 each when you buy 10 participating items 1 box pasta — marked down to $0.39 Taco Kit — marked down to $0.99 Half & Half — $1.49 5 cans Green Giant veggies — $0.49 each when you buy 10 participating items Grapes — $0.99/lb. 2 packages meat — marked down to $2.50 each Milk — $2.79 Honeycrisp apples — 3 lb. bag for $2.99 4 cans Swanson broth — $0.49 each when buy 10 participating items Total with tax: $48.34 Dinners From This Past Week Sunday — Frozen pizza, leftovers (fend for yourself) Monday — Chicken Tetrazzini, Best Ever Bran Muffins, Green Beans, Celery with peanut butter Tuesday — Chicken Noodle Soup, Biscuits, Grapefruit, Pumpkin Bars Wednesday — Pumpkin Pancakes, Bacon, Cinnamon Apples in the Instant Pot Thursday — Roast with Potatoes and Carrots and Onions in the crockpot Friday — $0.45 Potato Soup with bacon and cheese Sunday — Dinner out What did you eat at your house this week? Any winner frugal recipes you tried that you think we should try? [...]
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Men’s Journal Magazine Subscription Discount

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Men’s Journal Magazine Subscription Discount
You can subscribe to Men’s Journal Magazine for only $4.99 per year (91% off)! You can order up to 4 years at this price! Just enter coupon code PENNYPINCH at checkout to watch the price drop. Men’s Journal is for men who love adventure. Each issue features product reviews on the gear you need – from sports ... Read More about Men’s Journal Magazine Subscription Discount The post Men’s Journal Magazine Subscription Discount appeared first on Penny Pinchin' Mom. [...]
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Piggy Banks vs. Banking Apps: Teaching Kids About Money in the Digital Age

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Piggy Banks vs. Banking Apps: Teaching Kids About Money in the Digital Age
When you buy food with a swipe of a card and pay bills with a click of a button, what are your kids learning about money? “It is getting harder and harder to teach our kids about money and finance in the digital world because there’s just not as much opportunity to interact with money,” said Liz Frazier, a New York-based financial planner and author of the upcoming book “Beyond Piggy Banks and Lemonade Stands.” In a world of neat budgeting apps and debit cards for kids, Frazier recommends sticking with the basics — at least initially. Start kids on the three piggy bank system — one for spending, one for saving, one for sharing. Frazier uses simple clear jars so they can see their money grow. Children also learn about money by watching their parents. While swiping a debit card at the store makes sense to you, kids don’t concretely view that transaction as spending money. “As parents, we should try to expose [children] to real money whenever we can,” she said. For those who don’t regularly carry around cash, this is easier said than done. Frazier recommends starting off with smaller purchases like coffee or lunch at a restaurant. Show your kids the bill, help them count out money for payment and ask them to check if they received the correct change. When you aren’t using physical money — like when you use a debit card for groceries or a check for a school fundraiser — treat those moments as opportunities to advance the money conversation. “Start explaining the differences between what payment method you’re using — the debit card, credit card and cash — as you’re using it,” Frazier said. “They’re not going to totally understand everything in the beginning, but you just want to get them comfortable with the product.” Once you feel your child has an understanding of money basics and has had plenty of interaction with physical cash, opening a bank account for your kid can serve as a good transition to working with online tools and digital transactions. Fight the temptation to start an online account from the convenience of home. Visiting a brick-and-mortar bank or credit union is a better learning experience, Frazier said. “Go to the bank together and have the banker explain to your child that you’re opening up an account,” she said. “At this point you can get a debit card and start using it together at the store or getting out money at the ATM. You can also look at the statements every month, or every week if you want to, and walk through what money you put in [and] what you took out.” Opening a savings account is a good opportunity to introduce your kids to the concept of interest — how their money increases when they let their savings sit. Pro Tip When introducing your kids to money management apps, Frazier recommends including them in the research to find one that is established, secure and engaging. Conversations about money lessons for kids should stay positive and focus on useful information. If money stresses you out, do your best not to convey that to your children. Instead focus on the lessons you’ve learned from your financial mistakes. And don’t forget to tell your kids about your success and what goals you have. It’s Never Too Late to Provide Money Lessons for Kids Speaking of financial mistakes, Frazier said exposing your kids to money at an early age allows them to make mistakes when they’re young enough that the consequences aren’t so weighty. Maybe they spend all their money on a trendy gadget that turns out to be a dud, or they give in to an impulse purchase that sets them back from saving for something they really want. The fallback from those choices isn’t as devastating as not having any savings when an emergency pops up as an adult. FROM THE BUDGETING FORUM Budgeting as a Couple 5/10/19 @ 7:21 PM How to get better coupons 4/30/19 @ 9:41 PM Have you tried the Zero Based budgeting method? 6/7/19 @ 9:58 AM Teacher Budgeting for the Summer 5/22/19 @ 9:18 AM See more in Budgeting or ask a money question If you’ve missed out on teaching your kids about money in kindergarten and now they’re in their teenage years, it isn’t too late to start having personal finance discussions. As a financial planner, Frazier sees the negative consequences that come from people not being taught about money. The Penny Hoarder conducted a financial literacy survey in March and found that adults who didn’t grow up learning about money made less income and had less savings than those who were exposed to financial literacy growing up. Teaching your kids about money is the best gift you can give your children, Frazier said. “They are going to learn it one way or the other so you want them to learn it the right way,” she said. Key Takeaways Give your children experiences with tangible money. Include your kids in conversations about financial decisions. Open a bank account for your kids to transition them to the world of digital finance. Share your personal lessons, successes and goals with your children. Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. She already talks to her 4-year-old about money. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
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Paying Off Debt On One Income

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Paying Off Debt On One Income
Have you struggled with paying off debt — especially if you’re living on one income? These are some great tips and tricks on how to pay off debt in creative ways! {Need more encouragement? Read about finding contentment in the pit of debt, what to do when it feels like you’ll never get out of debt, how to overcome discouragement when you’re in debt, and how to stay motivated when you’re paying off debt.} Guest post from Ali of Meanwhile at Naptime: Debt is a killer. Unfortunately, our family has lots of it. We did a lot of things wrong our first few years of paying off debt… but this past year, we were able to pay off $32,000 (in addition to our mortgage payments), and it feels so good! How we got all that debt… Graduate school! The majority of our debt is student loans. We floundered a bit our first year or two after graduation, making minimum payments and telling ourselves it would all work out somehow. After a year of minimum payments, our debt was even higher as we couldn’t even keep up with the interest. We buckled down, made a plan and wrote up a budget. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by debt follow these tips to become debt free on a one income! Why We Decided to be a One-Income Family: I want to be a stay at home mom. I had a degree and a job, but once our daughter was born, I knew where I wanted to be. After moving across the country for graduate school, we had no family to watch our baby and childcare costs were so high that it just didn’t make sense for me to work anyway. We are both happy with this decision and we have been able to reach our financial goals on one income and here’s how we did it. How We Paid off $32,000 on ONE Income! If you’re interested in how to pay off debt, here are some of the tactics we used to help pay down our massive sum of debt… 1. We Implemented a Zero-Sum Budget You must have a budget. No way around this one. If you want to pay down your debt you have to tell your money exactly where to go. A zero-sum budget is simple, your income – expenses = 0. If you have any money left over at the end of the month you are not done. You must tell that money where to go. All our leftover money went to our student loans. 2. We Prioritized Our Debt Getting out of debt is our number one financial goal. We wrote down all our money goals — ALL of them. Then we prioritized and dropped those that wouldn’t fit in this year. We placed our student loans at the top. Sometimes when motivation started slipping we had to ask ourselves, would I rather go out to eat or be debt free? With that as our goal, we were able to keep ourselves on track each and every month. 3. We Put Our Entire Tax Return Towards our Debt We didn’t keep any of it — once that money came in, we threw it right at the debt! 4. We Used a Pay Raise to Increase Debt Payments With our budget in place, we knew how much money we spent on things like groceries and utilities. When my husband got a raise, the only numbers that changed were our debt payments and our savings. 5. We Put Any Bonuses Towards Deb Payments Any time we got a bonus at work, we put ALL of it toward our debts. 6. We Canceled Subscriptions When creating our budget, we had to make some sacrifices — subscriptions were one of the first things to go. For instance, I had been getting HGTV magazine for years. It was hard to say goodbye; but now, a year later I don’t miss it at all. Similarly, this year, we’re dropping Netflix to see how much closer we can get to our goal. 7. We Skipped Vacations We decided that we could have fun at home without a vacation. It was a tough decision but we saved hundreds of dollars by skipping the vacation this year. Create a family bucket list full of free or cheap ideas instead of a family vacation this year (see below!) 8. We Found Free Family Events Honestly, this one was one of our favorite “sacrifices”. By looking for free events we got to know our community quite well and saw how much our own city has to offer. Our local radio station has been a great resource for finding free events. We also checked with our local parks department, local schools, and we signed up for a community newsletter. As a result, we’ve been to museums, zoos, and even got a family caricature done for free! Take the time to look for free or cheap events and you won’t be disappointed. 9. We Sold Our Stuff Online Chances are there are plenty of things in your house that you don’t use or even need. Sell them online to make some extra money. We did… and as a result, we were able to refill our emergency fund and free up some cash for more payments! Final Thoughts on Paying Off Debt on a Single Income The hardest part is staying motivated. It’s hard to see your money go to payment after payment. We had to regularly remind ourselves of our desire to be debt free to keep us going. Now looking back, our year of paying off debt was actually a lot of fun — and SO worth it. We made many sacrifices, we followed a strict budget, and we prioritized our debt. We worked hard and found lots of ways to save money too — and as a result, we paid off $32,000 in just ONE year, living on ONE income! I am forever grateful I get to stay home with my babies every day. We’re still working on our debt, and hoping to do EVEN BETTER this year! What are your best tips for how to pay off debt on one income? Ali is a stay-at-home mom to three kids. She is mastering the art frugal living and helps stay at home moms learn how to control their finances while running a home. Read all about mom life and frugal living at Meanwhile at Naptime. [...]
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