Truman’s Non-Toxic Household Cleaners Starter Kit for just $7.50 shipped!

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Truman’s Non-Toxic Household Cleaners Starter Kit for just $7.50 shipped!
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy here. Interested in non-toxic household cleaning options? Check out this deal on Truman’s Household Cleaners!! Have you heard of Truman’s? It’s a relatively new subscription service that delivers non-toxic household cleaners to your doorstep! Each Truman’s delivery includes four different cleaners for your kitchen, floors, bathroom, and glass surfaces. (And the kitchen spray is also an all-purpose cleaner!) You receive the spray bottles and cleaners on your very first delivery and then cleaner refill cartridges on each subsequent delivery. Each delivery of cleaners should last you 6 months, but you can pause, skip, cancel, or change your subscription at any time. And right now you can get 50% off your first subscription with code SUMMER at checkout. Here’s how: Head over to this page. Click on “Get Your Starter Kit.” Choose the $15 option. When you choose this option, you’ll be signed up for automatic subscriptions but you can pause, skip, or cancel your subscription at any time after your first order ships out. Click through to checkout. On the page where you enter all of your information, look on the right side of the page where it says “Have a discount code? Enter it here.” Use code SUMMER to get 50% off! You’ll pay just $7.50 and shipping is FREE. If you love Truman’s cleaning products and want to continue with your subscription, you’ll be automatically charged at the regular price of $15 for your subsequent deliveries. (Note: The next delivery ships out after 45 days, so be sure to go in and change that since each delivery lasts for 6 months!) If you don’t want to continue after your first discounted starter kit, just go in and cancel before your next shipment. Super simple! This seems really cool! Have any of you tried it yet? I’d love to hear in the comments! Go here to get your Truman’s Starter Kit for $7.50! (Just use code SUMMER.) [...]
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How to Pay for Law School

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How to Pay for Law School
If you’re planning to go to law school, plan on going into debt: 75% of law students take out student loans, according to Law School Transparency, a nonprofit organization. Borrowing may be necessary for law school, but your first choice should be financial aid you don’t have to repay. Here are the types of aid available... Ryan Lane is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: rlane@nerdwallet.com. The article How to Pay for Law School originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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Teach a Craft Or Run Errands — Plus 6 Other Gigs Perfect for Seniors

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Teach a Craft Or Run Errands — Plus 6 Other Gigs Perfect for Seniors
Older workers are re-entering or staying in the workforce in the highest numbers in decades. And many of them are giving the gig economy a shot. According to the latest workforce projections by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the participation rate for seniors age 65 and up has increased nearly 20 percentage points since 1996. Flexible work arrangements through side-gig apps and work-from-home jobs are making the transition easier. The customer-service and retail industries are also tapping into this burgeoning population of workers with targeted recruiting through AARP and churches. All this amounts to a lot of competition among employers — and ripe job opportunities for retirees. 8 Jobs For Retirees From errands to English-teaching or from ride-sharing to renting, these part-time jobs for seniors are tailor-fit for any older worker who wants to make a little extra money. 1. Become an Airbnb Host Got a spare room, apartment, house ― even a tent in a serene backyard? You can rent it out for extra cash on Airbnb. Airbnb is an online marketplace that allows folks to list their space for short-term rentals. Airbnb, after all, is short for Air Bed and Breakfast, which refers to the co-founders’ initial idea of charging guests to stay on air mattresses to help pay their San Francisco rent. In our guide to becoming an Airbnb host, staff writer Carson Kohler outlines all the do’s and don’ts of hosting on Airbnb. The five big tenets to qualify are: You must be able to provide the essentials, including toilet paper, soap, linens, and at least one towel and pillow per guest. You must be responsive to your potential guests, answering requests and inquiries within 24 hours. You should accept reservation requests when you’re available. You should avoid cancellations. In fact, the Airbnb cancellation policy is pretty strict — you’ll find it outlined in our guide above. You should be able to keep a high overall rating from guests. Before listing your home or apartment online, be sure to check with your local government, which may regulate or outright ban short-term rentals. While there is no cost to register your rental, some things to consider are fees Airbnb charges every time someone books your space, in addition to municipal short-term rental taxes. Depending on your area, taxes and fees could reach as high as 21% of your listing price. 2. Chauffeur With Uber or Lyft By now, you probably know the gist of driving with ride-sharing services: You use an app to connect with people who need rides. You drive them somewhere in your own car, and they pay automatically through the app. The two biggest players in the space — Uber and Lyft — have an intense rivalry, but both apps are fair options if you’re just starting out. Each app is fundamentally the same for drivers: You log in when you want to work, wait for a notification that means someone’s hailed a ride, then pick them up and drop them off at their destination. You earn money based on how many rides you take, and you automatically get paid each week (or more often, if you choose) through direct deposit. To become a driver, applicants need: To be at least 21 years old. A four-door automobile, 2002 or newer. A valid U.S. driver’s license. At least a year of driving experience. Beyond that, senior editor Dana Sitar breaks down the nuances in our Lyft vs Uber guide. FROM THE MAKE MONEY FORUM tutoring business 6/16/19 @ 6:17 PM WFH Transcription Woes?? 6/16/19 @ 6:12 PM Need advice on working from home 6/14/19 @ 8:35 AM How to earn money with simple idea! 6/8/19 @ 8:25 AM See more in Make Money or ask a money question 3. Rent out Your Car If you don’t feel like chaufferring others around — or driving at all, for that matter — you can rent out your unused car. If you try to do that on your own, you’ll probably invalidate your insurance. And you have to find customers. But companies like GetAround and Turo will find the customers for you and provide the insurance. Even General Motors launched a car-sharing service called Maven for owners of a GM vehicle (Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet or GMC) that’s a 2015 model or newer. Creating an account with all three companies is free. Listing your car on GetAround costs $20 a month, plus a one-time $99 installation fee for a remote receiver to unlock your car for customers. Maven and Turo don’t charge monthly fees but take a percentage of earnings from your listing. According to Maven estimates, renting out your car for a day could earn you between $80 and $225 depending on the model. Payout is in as little as five days (for Turo) or as much as a month (for Maven). 4. Run Errands for Others Through side-gig apps like TaskRabbit and Postmates, getting paid to run errands is as easy as it’s ever been. With both apps, users can browse through a list of tasks that locals need help with. Grocery runs, picking up a package from the UPS store, taking someone’s animal to obedience training — all fair game. Postmates is focused on delivery-related tasks. You can deliver via car, bicycle or foot. Just create a free account, then you’ll receive a welcome kit in the mail within a week (a free delivery bag and a prepaid card to make your purchases). Link the card to the Postmates Fleet app, and you’re off to earning extra money. TaskRabbit works a little differently. The services are much broader, including home improvement, maintenance, administrative, cleaning, event planning and — of course — delivery and other errand-related tasks. Creating an account is also free. Income from both apps varies on a task-by-task basis. There aren’t any minimums in the amount of tasks you’re required to complete, either. You’ll be able to see the rates and choose to accept them before embarking on the errand. While not average earnings, some high-performing users make more than $2,000 a month. See how these Taskers made thousands using TaskRabbit. 5. Teach Your Craft at Michael’s Can you knit? Do needlepoint? Build a ship in a bottle? These crafts, once thought of a throw-backs, are back in a big way. The arts-and-crafts retailer Michael’s unveiled its Community Classroom in late 2018. The program offers a way to connect local “Makers,” aka people skilled in hands-on crafts, to teach at the nearest Michael’s. It’s up to the teachers, however, to recruit students for their classes. Michaels splits the profits from student registration, with Michael’s keeping 30% of the course price, and the teachers pocketing 70%. The program is still in beta as it expands to all U.S. Michael’s locations, but most Michael’s stores currently offer it. No previous teaching experience is required and the program is open to everyone — not just Michael’s employees. To become a Community Classroom instructor, submit a proposal that includes: A detailed description of what you plan to teach. A personal bio that explains your expertise, including a photo of yourself. Logistics, such as the location, required materials for the lesson, date and time. Accepted instructors receive Community Classroom ID and a 15% in-store discount. 6. Tutor English Online English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teachers are in high demand. To keep up, many [...]
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8 Things Private Equity Firms Look for in Companies

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8 Things Private Equity Firms Look for in Companies
The post 8 Things Private Equity Firms Look for in Companies appeared first on ONEtoONE Corporate Finance. [...]
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