Xbox One X Black Friday 2019 Deals: Are They Worth It?

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Xbox One X Black Friday 2019 Deals: Are They Worth It?
NerdWallet is here to help you win Black Friday while leaving your budget intact. We spend the time, you save the money. Visit regularly for holiday tips and announcements about your favorite products. Black Friday is Nov. 29. Microsoft’s most advanced gaming system, the Xbox One X, joins rivals like the PS4 and Nintendo Switch... Lauren Schwahn is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: lschwahn@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @lauren_schwahn. The article Xbox One X Black Friday 2019 Deals: Are They Worth It? originally appeared on NerdWallet. [...]
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This week in Fintech

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This week in Fintech
Every day we bring you fresh insights about Fintech from an elite group of Authors who are just like you – senior executives, entrepreneurs and investors on the frontlines of the global Fintech & Crypto revolution. Once a week Daily Fintech’s Editor summarises these posts so that busy people can get a peek at what […] The post This week in Fintech appeared first on Daily Fintech. [...]
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8 of My Favorite Things to Buy at Target

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8 of My Favorite Things to Buy at Target
I’ve literally been shopping at Target my entire life. I grew up in Shoreview, Minnesota, and the very first Target ever opened in the neighboring Twin Cities suburb of Roseville in 1962, five years before I was born. Our favorite local store with the red bull’s-eye logo helped launch a discount-store chain that today boasts more than 1,800 stores. I now live in Seattle... [...]
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Here’s How a Health Savings Account Can Help You Save on Health Care Costs

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Here’s How a Health Savings Account Can Help You Save on Health Care Costs
When signing up for health insurance through your job, you may have been given the option of opening an HSA, or health savings account.  An HSA isn’t like a regular savings account. For one thing, there are a bunch of rules around how you can contribute and spend the money. But it can be a very useful and convenient way to set aside money for medical expenses while potentially saving you hundreds or even thousands of dollars in the long run. Here, we’ll explain how HSAs work and how they can benefit you. What Is an HSA?  The first thing you should know about an HSA is that you need to have an HDHP in order to qualify for one.  An HDHP stands for a high deductible health plan. With high-deductible plans, you generally pay less in premiums but have to meet a high annual deductible before your plan pays.  A deductible is the money you pay out-of-pocket before your insurance kicks in and starts providing certain benefits. Your premium is the monthly fee you pay to get health coverage. You can’t open a health savings account with just any health plan with a high deductible. According to the IRS, the deductible has to be no less than $1,350 for an individual or $2,700 for a family to qualify as a high deductible health plan in 2019. Those deductibles can go as high as $13,500 for a family. In addition, you can’t be enrolled in Medicare, have other health coverage or be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s tax return in order to be eligible to open an HSA. But if you do meet all those criteria, you’re in. So what’s the big deal about having an HSA anyway? The Benefits of an HSA A health savings account allows you to save money for various medical expenses without being taxed on that money. Any savings you don’t spend in a current year rolls over to the following year, and the money in your HSA stays with you even if you switch insurance plans, change jobs or retire. If you have this benefit through your job, your employer can direct a portion of your paycheck to your health savings account before taxes are taken out. If you make contributions to your HSA with income that’s already been taxed, you can deduct that money when filing your income taxes. “The advantage of contributing through payroll is you save not just federal and state income taxes but you also save on FICA taxes,” said Paul Fronstin, director of the health research and education program at the Employee Benefit Research Institute. Acronym alert: FICA stands for the Federal Insurance Contribution Act. Your FICA taxes are what you pay to fund Medicaid and Social Security. You also aren’t taxed when you spend HSA dollars, provided you’re spending the money on qualified medical expenses. The IRS has an entire list of qualified expenses, which includes things like: Deductibles Copayments Prescriptions Dental care Eye glasses Chiropractic care Breastfeeding supplies  You’ll usually receive a debit card or checks to spend your HSA money, but in some cases, you’ll have to pay out of pocket and get reimbursed later. When you spend money from your HSA, make sure to save receipts, your explanation of benefits forms or other types of documentation.  “You don’t have to send any documentation to your HSA provider,” Fronstin said. “The IRS requires that you have documentation, and if you get audited, you’re going to need that documentation.” Another benefit of having a health savings account is that you don’t have to pay taxes for any earnings from your account. “If you open an HSA, the money goes into a bank, and it earns interest like a bank account,” Fronstin said. “The interest rates are not high, but once you have a certain amount of money in your account… your HSA provider will likely permit you to invest that money in mutual funds.” Besides all those tax benefits, another upside of an HSA is that your employer — and other individuals — are allowed to contribute to your account. Can you say free money? The IRS does cap how much can be contributed to an HSA in a given year, though. In 2019, you can contribute up to $3,500 for individuals or $7,000 for families. If you’re 55 or older, you can contribute an additional $1,000. FROM THE SAVE MONEY FORUM Best ways to save money in shopping 7/23/19 @ 1:09 PM Free Food Giveaways - Do you participate 7/20/19 @ 12:07 PM Traveling 1/26/19 @ 9:01 PM S Summer Is Here: Is Your Electric Bill Affected by Running the AC? 7/17/19 @ 4:08 PM See more in Save Money or ask a money question The Challenges With HSAs One thing to keep in mind when you have an HSA is that you may be charged a fee to maintain your account. Also, if you use the money for something that’s not a qualified expense and you’re younger than 65, you’ll be taxed on it plus you’ll be hit with a 20% penalty.  After you reach age 65, you can use your HSA savings for nonmedical expenses without incurring a penalty, but you’ll still be taxed for it. Other challenges exist — not with having a health savings plan directly, but with having a high deductible health plan. Deciding which health insurance is right for you and your family is a personal decision, Fronstin said, and opting into a high deductible health plan won’t be the right choice for everyone.  Some people aren’t able to pay for health costs out of pocket before meeting their deductible and having insurance benefits kick in — resulting in people forgoing medical care to save money. High deductible health plans have also been criticized as being more for young, healthy people who don’t need much medical care. Standard preventive care, like getting your annual checkup, is generally covered under a high deductible health plan without having to reach your deductible. But patients who have ongoing medical needs could end up spending a lot of money before getting any benefit from their insurance. However, recent changes made by the federal government expanded the list of what’s considered preventive care and now includes 14 treatments, medications or devices for people with ongoing conditions like diabetes and heart disease. “These plans became a little more friendlier for people with chronic conditions,” Fronstin said. Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017. [...]
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SEC Adopts Rules and Interpretations To Enhance Protections and Preserve Choice for Retail Investors

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SEC Adopts Rules and Interpretations To Enhance Protections and Preserve Choice for Retail Investors
On June 5, the Securities and Exchange Commission voted to adopt a package of rules and interpretations designed to enhance the quality and transparency of retail investors’ relationships with investment advisers and broker-dealers. Specifically, the SEC approved Regulation Best Interest. Regulation Best Interest creates an enhanced standard of conduct applicable to broker-dealers at the time they recommend to a retail customer a securities transaction or investment strategy involving securities. When making a recommendation, a broker-dealer must act in the retail customer’s best interest and cannot place its own interests ahead of the customer’s interests. The enhanced standard of conduct includes the following obligations: Disclosure Obligation: Before or at the time of the recommendation, a broker-dealer must disclose, in writing, material facts about the scope and terms of its relationship with the customer. Care Obligation: A broker-dealer must exercise reasonable diligence, care and skill when making a recommendation to a retail customer. Conflict of Interest Obligation: Policies and procedures must be reasonably designed: To mitigate conflicts of interests that create an incentive for an associated person of the broker-dealer to place its interests or the interest of the firm ahead of the retail customer’s interest; When a broker-dealer places material limitations on recommendations that may be made to a retail customer (e.g., offering only proprietary or other limited range of products), to disclose the limitations and associated conflicts, and to prevent the limitations from causing the associated person or broker-dealer from placing the associated person’s or broker-dealer’s interests ahead of the customer’s interest; and To identify and eliminate sales contests, sales quotas, bonuses and non-cash compensation that are based on the sale of specific securities or specific types of securities within a limited period of time. Regulation Best Interest will become effective 60 days after it is published in the Federal Register, and will include a transition period until June 30, 2020 to give firms sufficient time to come into compliance. A Katten client advisory describing Regulation Best Interest will be forthcoming. The SEC’s press release is available here. [...]
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